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Old 04-04-2010, 11:50 PM   #16
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New Addition roof


Yes you need vents at the top of the slope of the roof where it meets the house
There are vents like a ridge vent for this

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Old 04-05-2010, 07:15 AM   #17
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You are right about the need for soffit AND vents at the top.

I think there must be a continuous vent available--I am not familiar with roofing --however this is a very common bit of construction --I'd be surprised if a continuous vent were not easily available.

Be sure to add insulation baffles above the roof insulation.


If the budget allows--consider using 2x6 studs for your walls--The higher insulation value will pay back the initial higher construction costs with a more comfortable room and lower air conditioning costs.

On the walls--you need pressure treated wood for the bottom plate.

Be sure that the rafter hangers and hurricane straps meet code--inspectors are dead serious about that.--(Also the anchor bolt spacing in the slab)

Best wishes--Mike--
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Old 04-05-2010, 07:15 AM   #18
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Scuba, I just did a search and found exactly what you are talking about. I thought you could only get ridge vents for peak roofs. Didn't realize that this was an option. I sure am glad I got on this site and asked the question. Thanks again!!!!
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Old 04-05-2010, 07:19 AM   #19
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I've got a buttload of 2x6 treated boards I can use for the walls. Just as long as they are straight enough. I had them on my deck for about a year, but was protected from the elements the whole time because of the roof above it. I'll look an see if they are straight enough to use. It shouldn't matter that they are treated should it?
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Old 04-05-2010, 07:50 AM   #20
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Correction, I just looked and I don't have a buttload as I had described but I do have about 25 that are still in really good shape. Now, I know that I will need many many more, due to the size of the room, but if I already have that many to start, would it make more sense to use those and do the walls in 2x6 like you mentioned, or just start with new 2x4 boards. I am pretty sure these 2x6 are in pretty good shape, however, I won't really know for sure until I unscrew them from the deck. Haha!!
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Old 04-05-2010, 07:51 AM   #21
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Treated is only allowed for the bottom plates in my area----You better check that out.


That goes back to the days when treated wood contained arsenic-Fire fighters tried their best to keep
toxic materials out of buildings.

--Mike--
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Old 04-05-2010, 08:12 AM   #22
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One more thing about using 2x6 for walls. If there won't be any load above the room, other than the roof of course, can I do a 24" on center or doni still need to stay with a 16 on center?
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Old 04-05-2010, 08:23 AM   #23
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24" centers should work--Is the outside wall supporting the roof? If so I'd keep to 16" centers ---
do your layout so that a wall stud is under each roof rafter,That is strongest---and makes for easier work down the line,(electric,duct work,any thing else )

That is just a good habit to get into.--Mike--
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Old 04-05-2010, 03:25 PM   #24
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So, I am sitting here talking to someone about the span from my house to the outside wall, which is going to be approximately 16 feet. He mentioned ordering trusses and the cost of the trusses would be very comparable to the cost of what it is going to take to make the roof/ceiling strong enough so it won't sag in the middle. I was also thinking of putting a half wall in there somewhere and putting 1 post in the center, which would help suppost the center of the span from the house to the outer wall. Any suggestions on how to do this, or any recommendations on trusses or not.

Thanks!!
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Old 04-05-2010, 04:23 PM   #25
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Trusses would be great--that could help a lot with the insulation and ventilation problems.

In our area Menards is a good place to get trusses---Look up truss manufacturers in the phone book.

---Mike---

No need to add any center support in a 16 foot span.
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Old 04-05-2010, 07:21 PM   #26
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You mentioned you were on a tight budget so check all your prices on trusses compared to stick frame. But if you are going to use something other than conventional lumber you might want to check into I joists. They are very light and are a pleasure to work with.
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Old 04-05-2010, 09:29 PM   #27
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I just did some checking around and this is what I have come up with. Not to mention that my father in law is a contractor and he gives me all kinds of useful advice.

I am going to go with a mono truss roof, which is only costing me $1010.00 which includes tax, delivery, etc. The mono trusses will be at 24 on center. The walls are going to be 2x6, which will allow for more insulation and lower utility bills, so will the truss system. I figured out that the truss system was only going to be about 300 bucks more, but well worth the extra money. Not to mention that I won't have to worry about any support beams in the middle. So, thanks to everyone here on the forum that have REALLY helped me out. I honestly think I will be ready to tackle this job as soon as I have the foundation ready to go.

If you have any other suggestions, please feel free to let me know. I am still going to check into the I joists as you suggested. Just want to weigh my options either way.

Thanks!!!

Mike
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Old 04-05-2010, 10:45 PM   #28
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Please get a permit. For the safety of you and your family, pets. The support at the house is critical for the trusses/rafters not to pull away and fall down..... This may have to be engineered for the liability involved with your home-owners Insurance carrier, only your local Building Department knows for sure. You may need to figure the added loads on the existing window headers before you knock out that new doorway into the new space. They will tell you how thick the new slab needs to be at the perimeter based on the loads there. To proper hold-downs required for your area to anchor the addition in a high wind or seismic incident. A vapor barrier under the slab so you don't mold your ceiling material. Required heating/cooling, light and ventilation for human occupancy. Minimum size for hallways, rooms and egress from them in case of fire.

Be safe, Gary
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Old 04-05-2010, 11:10 PM   #29
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Gary,

I did get a permit for this addition and this is what I have to do in order to satisfy the city. I have to first get a structual engineer to test the soil and draw up the plans for my foundation. Then he does 2 inspections, a pre-pour and a final inspection. If anything is wrong, he will tell me prior to me pouring the slab.

Then after that is good to go, I will start framing up my walls and roof. From there, the city will send out a rep to do my framing inspection. Keep in mind, I have several friends that have done all of this before that said that they would offer some assistance if needed. Well, we will see about that huh?

So, after my framing inspection is done, the city requires a licensed electrician to wire everything up, then they will give me a certificate stating that everything was done to code. After that, I have to have a 3rd party insulation inspection, whatever the hell that is. Then after that is done, they come out for the final inspection and everything is good to go. Hopefully!!!

So, during this long drawn out process, I am open to any and all suggestions. I have gotten several quotes to get this addition done, which range from 65 - 72 grand. WOW!!!! Are you really serious????

So, my wife and I went to Lowes and a couple other places and priced every screw, bolt, receptacle, shingle, windows, electrical and anything you can think of and we came up with about 8 grand. Now, I know that it could be a little less, but probably not. It will more or less be more, but more than likely under 10 grand. All of that includes the rental of the mini excavator for the foundation, and me driving of course, and all the inspections that have to be done. I know it won't be an overnight job, but I have a 6 month goal and when it is all done, I will be sitting in it enjoying my new movie room and 5th bedroom that I built myself.

So, be prepared, I am going to post many pics of my progression!!

Thanks again for all of your help!!!

Mike
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Old 04-06-2010, 08:56 AM   #30
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Sounds good, trusses will save you a lot of work too
We had quotes over $60k just for rough framing of our addition
So I built it myself too...mines a bit bigger

Its a lot of work...but is worth it

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