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-   -   Need some advice on venting a dryer. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/need-some-advice-venting-dryer-108833/)

John_W 06-26-2011 01:27 PM

Need some advice on venting a dryer.
 
6 Attachment(s)
Currently it vents into the crawl space through a hole in the floor. The hole is right over the sill plate. That area is blocked from access to the crawlspace proper by a floor joist. I don't want to cut a hole in the floor joist, and weaken the floor support, as that part of the laundry room floor takes quite a beating from the washer.

It seems like the choices are to:

1. Go out the wall behind the dryer (onto the front porch).This would be the easiest and is my preference. It will be a little unsightly, but we can live with that. If I can place the hole directly behind the dryer's vent, this could be a 'straight' shot. The dryer might have to be placed on a short stand to line things up.

2. Go up into the attic and down through a new soffit vent. This looks iffy because of a tight space where the wall meets the roof rafters. Plus, I don't like the idea of going upwards a 'long' distance with the dryer exhaust.

3. Go through the roof. I don't like putting an extra hole in the roof, so this option is not desirable either. Plus, it involves going upwards a 'long' distance with the dryer exhaust.

We live in northern Alabama, so we get heat, humidity, bugs and cold.

Please take a look at the pictures and tell me what you think I should do - including any details on routing the vent, locating the hole(s), how to cut and seal the holes, whether I need to use a double walled vent pipe (where it goes through the hole(s)), etc.

Thanks for your help.

John_W 06-26-2011 01:29 PM

Advice on venting a dryer - more pictures.
 
3 Attachment(s)
Here are the other pictures.

user1007 06-26-2011 02:03 PM

You do not want to be venting a dryer, with its lint, up into the attic or out the roof. Far from code compliant and a real fire hazard.

Distributing dryer lint on the outdoor stairs is not ideal and is going to add a maintenance chore but seems your best option.

Gary in WA 06-26-2011 03:04 PM

Up through the roof is code compliant, if under the maximum distance as per dryer manufacturer or local AHJ. http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...up65cYgFwMvULw

Raising the dryer will help when transferring the clothes from the washer, I elevated mine on a plywood box years before the store-bought ones came out. A straight shot duct run is best, be sure to include the back-draft damper required by code on the termination hood (get a type "A"): http://www.appliance411.com/faq/dryer-vent-length.shtml

You may want to add a handrail to your front (public use) stairs for liability. Transition ducting is limited to one 8' section........ not as pictured.

Gary

High Gear 06-26-2011 03:04 PM

Venting to a front stairway entrance is ..well tacky at best , but I've seen

about as bad even on new construction.

If you notch the bottom of the joist and sister it for strength maybe you

have a better exit you could use.

Ideally a dryer vent should vent to the shortest path but you can run a

surprisingly long vent ( bends will shorten this length

( you dryer manual will show maximum lengths with max allowable bends ect.))

There are even duct boosters but I have no experience with them.

My run is probably a good 20'or more just to get away from this problem.

You will want to inspect your duct more often the longer the run.

hardwareman 06-26-2011 08:30 PM

its never ideal to run it up through the roof but sometimes that is your best option. In your case I would go through the roof, just make sure it is accessible for future vent clean out because you will be cleaning it out.

John_W 06-26-2011 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR in WA (Post 674458)
Up through the roof is code compliant, if under the maximum distance as per dryer manufacturer or local AHJ. http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...up65cYgFwMvULw

Raising the dryer will help when transferring the clothes from the washer, I elevated mine on a plywood box years before the store-bought ones came out. A straight shot duct run is best, be sure to include the back-draft damper required by code on the termination hood (get a type "A"): http://www.appliance411.com/faq/dryer-vent-length.shtml

You may want to add a handrail to your front (public use) stairs for liability. Transition ducting is limited to one 8' section........ not as pictured.

Gary

Thanks for the information and the excellent links.

That plywood base sounds like it might be sturdier than the store-bought metal ones.

If I go straight through the wall to the porch, the hole can be 3 feet away from the window, vertically, but will not be 3 feet away horizontally. Horizontally, it would probably be about 10 inches either side of the left side of the window (as viewed from the porch). Is that a problem?

Gary in WA 06-26-2011 09:55 PM

Only if you are getting it inspected...... it is a safety concern especially with a gas dryer due to the by-products from burning and being recir. through an open window. The window should be safety glazed for today's code, but only when selling- 5' up and 3' to glass;http://www.deckmagazine.com/article/54.html You may be required at selling to bring it up to code or a reduction price, also your H.O. insurance carrier may not honor a fire claim due to this paper trail you left......
better to do it right.

Gary

John_W 06-26-2011 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by High Gear (Post 674459)
Venting to a front stairway entrance is ..well tacky at best , but I've seen

about as bad even on new construction.

If you notch the bottom of the joist and sister it for strength maybe you

have a better exit you could use.

Ideally a dryer vent should vent to the shortest path but you can run a

surprisingly long vent ( bends will shorten this length

( you dryer manual will show maximum lengths with max allowable bends ect.))

There are even duct boosters but I have no experience with them.

My run is probably a good 20'or more just to get away from this problem.

You will want to inspect your duct more often the longer the run.

Thanks for your comments.

The 'sister' idea is a new one for me. If I did that, there would be two or three routes available through the crawl.

The straightest would be about 35 feet long and have 1 90 degree and 2 45 degree bends.

The shortest would be about 12 feet long and have 2 90 degree bends, 2 45 degree bends and require punching holes through two block walls plus the brick below the front porch. We could hide the vent behind a bush, so it might look better than the above-porch option.

My wife doesn't mind the idea of the above-porch option. She sees no problem with sweeping up the lint after the week's washing and drying are done.

I like the above-porch option because it will be something I am comfortable doing myself. The other options (roof and crawlspace) are a probably too much for me to attempt on my own.

John_W 06-26-2011 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR in WA (Post 674767)
Only if you are getting it inspected...... it is a safety concern especially with a gas dryer due to the by-products from burning and being recir. through an open window. The window should be safety glazed for today's code, but only when selling- 5' up and 3' to glass;http://www.deckmagazine.com/article/54.html You may be required at selling to bring it up to code or a reduction price, also your H.O. insurance carrier may not honor a fire claim due to this paper trail you left......
better to do it right.

Gary

So, sounds like I need to go through the crawl or the roof.


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