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-   -   Need more space, time to finish the basement. Thoughts? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/need-more-space-time-finish-basement-thoughts-117323/)

GingerMan 09-15-2011 02:05 PM

Need more space, time to finish the basement. Thoughts?
 
I have a 6 year old house with an unfinished basement in CT. I'd like to finish a 460sq ft area leaving a storage closet and mechanicals / work shop area unfinished. Not a ton of space as basements go, but with a growing family I need it.

The space stays dry, a kenmore dehumidifier keeps it near 50% without running a lot. We had water once almost 3 years ago, nothing before or since including last months hurricane. Since that water came in (where the wall and slab meet) I have added top soil to a couple areas where the back fill had settled in towards the house. Was that the issue, who knows. The foundation is drained, and the gutters are piped down into that system which flows into an under ground collection pit I share with my neighbor.

My current plan is to lay dricore panels over the floor, leaving air space for the slab to breathe. Looks like a good subfloor for wall to wall carpet when done. I have 9ft from the slab to the bottom of the joists above, so height is not an issue.

Walls I am torn between stick framing and a modular product called INSOFAST for the outside walls. Waiting for a sample of it, but looks like it goes up fast, installs electrical easily and then drywall over it with the right type of drywall that is somewhat mildew resistant. There will be two partition walls in the construction as well. No questions about that.

I am always running wires and needing access it seems, so a drop ceiling sounds best even though they aren't the best looking.

I plan to do the sub floor, framing, electrical myself, and hire out the drywall and ceiling and painting. Trim work I can handle.

So here are the questions.

Does anyone have experience good or bad with INSOFAST? And DRICORE? The space is small enough that the cost of each isn't huge, and the time savings seems worth while.

As far as HVAC, I have a 2 zone forced air system with central air and gas heat. I could add a 3rd damper and a new controller to that with a thermostat for the area or just put in a electric baseboard to two. I can decide that once it is built and I see how comfortable it is.

Should I pull permits and get the proper inspections or is it more of a hassle than it is worth?

Never taken on a project this big before, but I have all the tools and then some and since it is in the basement I can take my time.

I appreciate any insight you guys who have done this before can send my way.

Joe Carola 09-15-2011 04:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GingerMan (Post 728899)

Should I pull permits and get the proper inspections or is it more of a hassle than it is worth?

What a dumb question when you know you're supposed to pull permits and then ask if you should. Has nothing to do with it being a hassle. It's what you're supposed to do...especially when doing electrical.... .

GingerMan 09-15-2011 05:07 PM

That is why this is a DIY forum and people ask questions Joe. The reason I asked is if I pull permits town hall has a record of the work and will assess my taxes for a "rec room" quickly. If I don't pull the permits, then they won't catch up with me for a few years until they come door to door like they did last fall. The basement finishing "system" contractor I had here to estimate it last year said it was 50/50 with how many of thier customers do the permits for just that reason.

If you say I need permits I'll get them. That is why I asked.

Gary in WA 09-16-2011 11:44 PM

Yes, pull all required permits, especially electrical!

You will have a "paper trail" to satisfy your H.O. Insurance carrier in case of future claim..... and when you sell the house.

"Walls I am torn between stick framing and a modular product called INSOFAST for the outside walls. Waiting for a sample of it, but looks like it goes up fast, installs electrical easily and then drywall over it with the right type of drywall that is somewhat mildew resistant."----- looks very similar to closed-cell blue or pink, which even have space for battens to attach drywall. I have to laugh at their ad- any foam more than 3/4" will stop moisture, yet theirs is 2" thick.... then scare you will threat of mold. It has a void raceway for electrical wiring--- which effects the product R-value and water storage ability in the air-space. Specially grooved-- for water run-off--nah,---- just use foam board as it lets the water through slowly as diffusion to dry to the inside. You could groove flat foam board to achieve the same look, can't see where they do anything other than reduce the thickness= R-value- at the grooves.

The floor panels are good if you have a moist slab. Other options are foam board then plywood, FL mat.
http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...lation-systems

http://www.cosella-dorken.com/bvf-ca...roducts/fl.php

Be certain to canned foam any wiring/plumbing holes and air-seal the rim joists; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...-at-rim-joist/

Gary

Joe Carola 09-17-2011 07:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GingerMan (Post 729015)
That is why this is a DIY forum and people ask questions Joe.

Since when does an adult have to come on a DIY'er forum and ask if they need to pull a permit to finish a basement when they know that they should ?

Quote:

The basement finishing "system" contractor I had here to estimate it last year said it was 50/50 with how many of thier customers do the permits for just that reason.
So....that means 50% of the people are doing the wrong thing. What's your point? Why do you care if 50% of the people are doing the wrong thing. That still shouldn't help you decide whether you should or should not pull permits.

Quote:

If you say I need permits I'll get them. That is why I asked.
Again, you knew you were supposed to pull them before you asked the question here. Why would you still ask the question and have people on the internet help you decide?

gregzoll 09-17-2011 11:42 AM

Why does this thread remind me of many episodes of Mike Holmes shows. We have a friend who did her basement, and yes she did not pull permits. If you look at everything, it is all within code, done by the rules and codes. Only reason that her's will fly under the radar, is that our municipality is not that stringent, when it comes to remodels.

Now if she did an addition, then yes there is no getting around that with our city. If I was the OP, and knowing that code enforcement loves money, and will bankrupt you on this stuff, you best pull permits, and make sure that you and the sub's know their stuff.

GingerMan 09-17-2011 01:42 PM

Permits it is. I spoke to the town building department, his directions: fill out the permit application and take to the tax department first. Great. Then zoning, then back to building once the others sign off. I need to finish my drawings first, then apply for the permits.

Still no sign of the sample INSOFAST panels I requested. If they don't come this week I will skip them and go with the more conventional foam route.

Thanks for the input guys.

bkvanbek 07-05-2012 04:59 PM

just saw this thread. We have used a lot of InSoFast. Great product.

Evstarr 07-05-2012 11:02 PM

Well it's been three quarters of a year so he's probably decided by now lol. But it might help someone else.

bkvanbek 07-06-2012 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Evstarr (Post 958971)
Well it's been three quarters of a year so he's probably decided by now lol. But it might help someone else.


That was my thought.

GingerMan 07-09-2012 08:22 AM

You'd be right, the job is done. Started right after thanksgiving and finished in end of January. I had a contractor who is a friend of the family and was out of work do the floor (DRICORE) and stick framing. I ran electrical, had it inspected. He did insulation, another inspection. He then did drywall, doors, and was complete. I did finished electrical, trim, and paint with a final inspection.

The permit and inspection process I did myself and it was hassle free. Of course the tax assessor now wants to come visit me.

The DRICORE floor went down first and the framing is on top of that, no wood touches concrete at any point. Conventional pad and carpet makes it feel like a normal room over that DRICORE, it is well worth the cost.

I did an Armstrong drop ceiling with tiles that look like panels, the end result looks great for a drop ceiling. None of that industrial look at all. I think it was an armstrong tile number 1205.

Lighting is key, I have 14 recessed Halo cans across 2 dimmers with 75w halogen lamps. Rarely use more than 50% on the dimmers but when you need light there is plenty of it.

Adding this 500sq ft to the house made all the difference in the world, well worth the efforts.


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