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Old 05-03-2008, 06:03 PM   #1
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need cement help


Okay, heres the situation. My house is technically 2 seperate houses that were put together sometime circa 1940 (according to an older person down the street) but am not totally sure. The origional half of the house's foundation is flat rock (built 1896) and the "newer" half is block. the block half gets ALOT of water coming from where the walls meet the footer. At this time of year it is almost a continous flow into the basement (thank god for sump pumps!). Usually around mid july the floor dries up if I keep the doors open (2 entrances from outside - 1 door from an entryway off the side and a bilco door around back). But I need to get it dry and semi sealed before then as we are adding a wood furnace and plan to store the wood down there.

What can I use to stop the water while it is still wet? Hydrolic cement?

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Old 05-03-2008, 07:20 PM   #2
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need cement help


you might have already done this, but for water coming into the basement, first thing to check is the outside landscaping. My in-law makes a living water proofing basements, I know it can be done. If you can't redirect the water from the outside, just know when you patch one spot, keep an eye on where the water will find the next opening to come in. I'ved used the hydraulic cement, seems good on small spots but I don't need a sump pump, I installed drain pipe to direct the water to out front, I have lots of clay in the soil, not very good drainage. good luck to you.

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Old 05-03-2008, 09:27 PM   #3
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need cement help


Agreed, patching the gap where water is coming is probably not going to solve your water problem. Hydraulic cement is an excellent patch material though, and will usually effectively seal any gap you put it in.
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Old 05-04-2008, 09:05 AM   #4
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need cement help


I have thought about re grading around the house, but it seems like the spots where its coming in (or at least general areas) are spots where there is something else... like the front of the house had a covered deck that is like 10ft, so the water coming from the roof is 10ft away from the foundation... and on the side there is an entry way then the driveway... im not sure where i would try and direct it away!


Im not looking for a perfectly dry basement to finish here, i just need to cut down on the amount of moisture there...
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