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-   -   Nailing two 2" x 4" together ? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/nailing-two-2-x-4-together-188312/)

westbank 10-09-2013 12:54 PM

Nailing two 2" x 4" together ?
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hello,

I need to nail one 2" x 4" on top of another 2" x 4". I was thinking about using 5" spiral nails but not sure if it's enough ? I need to extend the height of a frame/soffit that was made to retain keep the batt insulation in place.

Should I use tie plates instead of simply nailing the 2" x 4" together ?

tony.g 10-09-2013 01:00 PM

Might bounce if you nail it?
Can you screw it using 4" screws (drill 1" dia holes 2" deep first as countersink).

cortell 10-09-2013 01:14 PM

When framing an interior soffit/bulkhead, I like to use a combination of screws and common nails. The nails provide the shear strength (which the average screw has little of), and the screws provide the pull out strength (which nails have little of). The sheetrock exerts a downward load on the framing, and that puts the nails' pull-out strength to the test. Actually, it's not so much the drywall I worry about, but that someone might put a screw eye into that framing and try to hang something heavy. With a few screws, I breath easier.

In your case, I would do the same. Use both nails and screws. The screws don't have to be rated for structure (that would be overkill in this case, since they're basically just acting as a backup), but they should also not be drywall screws. I have a preference for SPAX screws.

SeniorSitizen 10-09-2013 01:33 PM

Where on earth did you find lumber that flat? :laughing:

If the next 2 pieces aren't that good there is an easy method of pulling them together.

westbank 10-09-2013 01:40 PM

It's hard to find long wood screws but I was to find 5" deck screws. The shear strength seems to be close to regular wood screws.

Initially I was thinking of using only screws but a mix of both nails and screws could be even better.

Quote:

Originally Posted by cortell (Post 1251437)
When framing an interior soffit/bulkhead, I like to use a combination of screws and common nails. The nails provide the shear strength (which the average screw has little of), and the screws provide the pull out strength (which nails have little of). The sheetrock exerts a downward load on the framing, and that puts the nails' pull-out strength to the test. Actually, it's not so much the drywall I worry about, but that someone might put a screw eye into that framing and try to hang something heavy. With a few screws, I breath easier.

In your case, I would do the same. Use both nails and screws. The screws don't have to be rated for structure (that would be overkill in this case, since they're basically just acting as a backup), but they should also not be drywall screws. I have a preference for SPAX screws.


joecaption 10-09-2013 01:47 PM

Why not just use one 2 X 8 and skip all the work?

cortell 10-09-2013 01:48 PM

Sorry. Why do you want 5" screws or nails? 3" is all you need. You just need to fasten one 2x4 to the other, right? I wouldn't try to sink the fasteners into the cripple stud ends that the first 2x4 is fastened to. That's just going to increase the chances of splitting those studs, which will weaken the connection.

Rule of thumb: a nail should be no closer than 1/2 its length to another nail and no closer than 1/4 its length to the edge of the wood.

cortell 10-09-2013 01:50 PM

Wait a minute... which way are you attaching them. The picture is ambiguous as it doesn't show depth.

GBrackins 10-09-2013 02:11 PM

you could use tie plates or a piece of plywood

westbank 10-09-2013 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1251453)
Why not just use one 2 X 8 and skip all the work?

I wish but the 2" x 4" framing is currently nailed and glued to concrete walls.

westbank 10-09-2013 02:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cortell (Post 1251455)
Sorry. Why do you want 5" screws or nails? 3" is all you need. You just need to fasten one 2x4 to the other, right? I wouldn't try to sink the fasteners into the cripple stud ends that the first 2x4 is fastened to. That's just going to increase the chances of splitting those studs, which will weaken the connection.

Rule of thumb: a nail should be no closer than 1/2 its length to another nail and no closer than 1/4 its length to the edge of the wood.

Sorry for the confusion. I need to nail/attach the 2" face with the other 2" face of the 2" x 4". So since a 2" x 4" is 1.5" x 3.5", it would be 7" high and would require screws of about 4.5" to 5".

westbank 10-09-2013 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBrackins (Post 1251469)
you could use tie plates or a piece of plywood

Didn't think about using plywood - that's good idea. I was thinking about the ties but they are not cheap.

cortell 10-09-2013 02:30 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by westbank (Post 1251475)
Sorry for the confusion. I need to nail/attach the 2" face with the other 2" face of the 2" x 4". So since a 2" x 4" is 1.5" x 3.5", it would be 7" high and would require screws of about 4.5" to 5".

Sigh. This is what I think of when I hear "soffit", so extending the depth of that would mean *face-nailing* one 2x4 to another.

Disregard my off-point advice:wink:

joecaption 10-09-2013 04:28 PM

Unpressure treated wood should not have been used in direct contact with the concrete.


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