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buildit45 04-12-2012 02:21 PM

Nail Question
 
I will be framing my basement and need a little help with the types of nails to use, i have checked my local codes and they are using the irc 2006 and ibc 2006.

1) Just want to make sure I understand this right, in both the irc and ibc it says Sole plate to joist or blocking, face nail 16d on 16"oc. So just to make sure this means I only need ONE 16d nail ever 16"oc to secure the top plate to the joist or blocking?

2) Not sure how to nail this in "Blocking between joists or rafters to top plate, toe nail 3 8d" how do you only put in 3 nails?

3) And what is a braced wall panel?

Thanks for the help?

cortell 04-12-2012 03:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buildit45 (Post 897440)
I will be framing my basement and need a little help with the types of nails to use, i have checked my local codes and they are using the irc 2006 and ibc 2006.

1) Just want to make sure I understand this right, in both the irc and ibc it says Sole plate to joist or blocking, face nail 16d on 16"oc. So just to make sure this means I only need ONE 16d nail ever 16"oc to secure the top plate to the joist or blocking?

2) Not sure how to nail this in "Blocking between joists or rafters to top plate, toe nail 3 8d" how do you only put in 3 nails?

3) And what is a braced wall panel?

Thanks for the help?


Ah. The good ol' nailing schedule...far too dry and ambiguous. In time it starts sinking in, though ;-)

1. Yes. Common nails. I believe the IBC also allows box nails in some cases (where splintering is a concern). They're very explicit in this regard, and for good reason. Common nails are significantly stronger than box nails.

2. What do you mean by "how do I only put three nails?"

3. A braced wall panel is a portion (or all) of a studded wall that is framed to prevent racking. Racking is prevented either with sheathing (plywood or OSB, typically) or with let-in bracing (1x4, typically), or any of various other methods allowed by code. These are the two most common methods. Exterior walls must be braced, and some interior ones may need to also. E.g., a building that is more than three times longer than its width has to employ braced interior walls.

buildit45 04-12-2012 03:32 PM

Thanks for the reply, I guess what I am looking for on the first question is, do I only have to put in 1 nail into the top plate at every joist location where the top plate runs the opposite direction of the joist, I have seen a lot of people put in 2 nails at each joist location, but I am going to hammer it all in so I want to hit as few 16d nails as possible.

On the second question the code says to put in the blocking using 3 8d nails by toenailing them. Not sure how I secure a piece of blocking in between the joist with only 3 nails.


Thanks for the help

cortell 04-12-2012 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buildit45 (Post 897473)
do I only have to put in 1 nail into the top plate at every joist location where the top plate runs the opposite direction of the joist, I have seen a lot of people put in 2 nails at each joist location, but I am going to hammer it all in so I want to hit as few 16d nails as possible.

Yes; only one nail (assuming your local building code doesn't override). Most of the scenarios in the nailing schedule require 2 or 3 nails, thus people may just feel more comfortable with two or assume two are needed.

Quote:

On the second question the code says to put in the blocking using 3 8d nails by toenailing them. Not sure how I secure a piece of blocking in between the joist with only 3 nails.
How a piece of blocking is fastened to the joists is dictated separately. The particular nailing requirement you quoted is how it needs to be fastened to the top plate. I.e., solid blocking located over a load bearing wall is fastened to three things: joist, joist and top plate. This is telling you how to fasten to the third of these. You would be situated above the block, nailing down at an angle, through the lower edge of the block into the top plate. Two nails on one side, one in the other (in between the other two nails).

cortell 04-12-2012 04:19 PM

BTW, I highly recommend "Complete Book of Framing" by Scot Simpson. It has 13 pages illustrating the nailing schedule in the 2006 IBC.

woodworkbykirk 04-12-2012 07:57 PM

when i nail plates down to the joist i always go with 2 spikes. much more holding power as it reduces the movement in the wall. also when nailing the plate down to the band joist (ribbon, belt, king joist) place your nails close to a stud so that electricians, plumbers and other sub trades are less likely to drill through a spike.. they hate trashing $25-40 auger bits

for fastening blocking with 3 nails they typically mean per end.. if you have blockign between two joists. you actually need 6 nails MINIMUM. if im face nailing i will use 2-3 depending on the size of hte lumber, the larger the stock the more fasteners. toe nailing has a different requirement its typcally 1 or 2 more than face nailing

Gary in WA 04-13-2012 12:54 AM

I agree with cortell, 1 nail in each joist above, it is a partition wall.

Use a poly sill sealer under the p.t. bottom plate for an air/thermal/capillary break from the slab.

No air space between insulation/wall.

Air seal the rim joists.

Air seal the drywall.

Air seal the foamboard on the concrete wall; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...study-analysis

Gary


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