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-   -   Moving Telepost (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/moving-telepost-157776/)

k_evjen 09-23-2012 10:41 PM

Moving Telepost
 
I've waded through the forums looking for some advice on moving my telepost in my basement, and I haven't found the answer.

Here's the story:

I'm slowly working on finishing my basement but I have an annoying telepost in the middle of everything. I've had an engineer come in and provide me with drawings (a cool 900 beans for that!) for what to use to brace my beam and move the post. What he wants me to do is put a strip of 1.9E LVL the full length of the beam, and pour a new footing and install a new post with a 13,000 lb capacity.

Here is where I'm running into problems. There is only one store in my area that will sell to me (not being a licensed contractor) and they don't have quite what I need. They have 2.0E LVL which from what I can tell from google is that 2.0 is the new 1.9, slightly stronger and 1.9's replacement.

The post: I wanted an adjustable telepost so that I could easily transfer the load from the old one to the new one (like one turn up on the new, one turn down on the old) but the place that will sell to me only had adjustable posts that are too long for the height of my beam. (9'1"-10').

Finally, my question: Is it possible to cut off the bottom of the new post to a useable height for me, or do I have to keep shopping around for the right size?

Thanks for any advice!

Kyle

aaronk 09-24-2012 04:51 AM

Oh man, I may be a newbie on these forums but I'm thinking that messing with the supporting structure of your house is something you should really contract out to the pros unless you really know what you're doing. I would follow the advice of the engineer you paid $900 to and go with his recommendation, even if you can't do it yourself.

I had to look up "telepost" to figure out what that is, and it looks like it's an adjustable jack post. I have four of these in my basement. From what I know, these posts are really only supposed to be temporary though I admit that I am using them permanently. One is really "supposed" to use lally columns with appropriate footings for permanent support of beams.

I know in newly constructed basements you basically have a tradeoff: Smaller beam, higher ceiling, with annoying supporting column in the middle; or, bigger beam, annoying lower ceiling, and no supporting column in the middle.

Good luck with your project.

allthumbsdiy 09-24-2012 09:12 AM

Most load-bearing ("lally") columns are steels tubes filled with concrete and they are cut to length (make sure to take beam and end plate thickness into consideration).

You can rent a pipe cutter to cut the steel tube.

I don't believe "adjustable telepost" are not meant to be used as permanent supports but since you hired an engineer, I would ask him about what is acceptable to replace your existing support.

mae-ling 09-24-2012 11:04 AM

Again - The telepost thing is a location thing. In the 4 provinces of Canada I have worked in they are permanent. Maybe a different strength or something then the temporary ones?

jomama45 09-24-2012 01:18 PM

Can't speak for everywhere, but here, adjustable jackposts are not only accepted by code, but are clearly the norm for the last 40+ years or so. For 13,000 pounds, you may need to upgrade to a 3.5" diameter column depending on height. Here's a link to "Tiger Posts" to give you the specs of what they make. There are certainly other manufacturer's that build similar columns. Here, i have my steel beam supplier typically make them for us.

http://www.tigerbrandjackpost.com/im...mn%20Sizes.pdf


As for jacking the beam up temporarily with the jackpost I'd warn that these posts aren't meant to lift, and you'll likely never be able to turn the screwjack under load. You'll need a bottle jack (or something else that can lift that kind of weight) and a 6x6, laminated dimensional lumber, etc.... to actually raise the beam.

notmrjohn 09-24-2012 02:00 PM

Have you contacted a licensed contractor to see if they will buy and resell to you what you want? Some will, some won't, some, depending on your locality may not be allowed to.

And your locality is...? Please add to your profile, it helps. Somebody here may be nearby and know a source or even have one.

GBrackins 09-24-2012 02:39 PM

1.9E and 2.0E are the modulus of elasticity given for a particular manufacturer's LVL, i.e., ILevel's LVL have a 1.9E, Boise has 2.0E. Typically engineer's that I work with will specify the 1.9E because a 2.0E will be stronger than the 1.9E for a given size of beam. If they specified the 2.0E you would not be able to purchase the ILevel beam, so it provides you with greater options in where to purchase the beam.

With that said I would follow the engineer's drawings to the letter. if you were required to get a permit to do the work and then vary from the drawing you will probably have issues when it is inspected. Typically we install the new column by first installing the new footing, and then the column. Next the additional members to the beam. After this has been performed and inspected by the engineer we would then remove the existing column that was planned on being removed. If you have any questions on the steps to follow call your engineer.

I myself prefer a 3" schedule 40 standard pipe column (3" inside diameter, 3-1/2" outside diameter) over a concrete filled lally column. The steel is a lot thinner in a lally column as it uses the compressive strength of concrete to support the load and the thin steel holds it together. I've seen the steel rusted through on older lally columns, especially when the basement or crawlspace is damp.

Just my thoughts .....

allthumbsdiy 09-24-2012 02:55 PM

Gary-

When you say 3" schedule 40, which material is that?

GBrackins 09-24-2012 03:58 PM

steel, its a standard pipe column ..... not pvc

Daniel Holzman 09-24-2012 07:12 PM

I agree with GBrackins about pipe supports, although in most cases concrete filled lally columns are code accepted and work fine, I also prefer the standard steel pipes. The use of adjustable columns is only permissible if the manufacturer of the adjustable columns rates the column for PERMANENT use. In many cases, the adjustable columns are not tested or rated for permanent use, although many building inspectors are not aware of the difference, and I have looked at many houses that have used temporary jack posts as temporary support, in some cases successfully, for many years. Regardless of whether a temporary post will work, it is not to code, and can cause all sorts of issues when you sell the house, if an inspector notices that your "permanent" support is only rated for temporary use.

jomama45 09-24-2012 08:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman (Post 1016648)
I agree with GBrackins about pipe supports, although in most cases concrete filled lally columns are code accepted and work fine, I also prefer the standard steel pipes. The use of adjustable columns is only permissible if the manufacturer of the adjustable columns rates the column for PERMANENT use. In many cases, the adjustable columns are not tested or rated for permanent use, although many building inspectors are not aware of the difference, and I have looked at many houses that have used temporary jack posts as temporary support, in some cases successfully, for many years. Regardless of whether a temporary post will work, it is not to code, and can cause all sorts of issues when you sell the house, if an inspector notices that your "permanent" support is only rated for temporary use.

Dan,

I think you're confusing the term "Telepost" with "adjustable column". Teleposts are typically sleeved posts that are indeed intended to be used temporarily. Adjustable columns, when installed correctly, have the large diameter screwjack at the bottom, totally encased in the concrete floor, with the concrete floor providing direct bearing support to the footing. Actually, 99% of the adj. columns we pour around end up with the entire hollow tube just above floor level, and the most robust section of the post, the thick cast threaded bottom plate, sits right at floor level. The bottom plate is far less likely to rust out & fail than the hollow steel tube of a "cut to fit" lally column........

mae-ling 09-24-2012 09:00 PM

Here telepost is the term used for the permanent adjustable post. It's a location thing.

Do whatever the engineer said exactly as he/she said.

k_evjen 10-04-2012 12:27 AM

Holy cow! My settings must be goofy for this forum, it only sent me one email for replies!

My location is Saskatoon, SK in Canada.

Here, teleposts are completely intended for permanent use. My house is from 1986 and they are the original supports that came with the house. They are not filled with concrete but the base is set into my slab, and is sitting on top of a 2'x2'x6" pad underneath that (according to my original drawings from '86!)

My engineer did not specify a height for the new post, but he did specify the size for the new pad (3x3x8") but not how deep to bury it. What I'm wondering is if I get a post that can support 13k lb but is say a foot or so too long, will it affect its weight bearing capability if I cut the excess off the bottom?

If you guys want, I can put up some pics of the beam, and maybe even a scan of the new and old drawings...

To me this seems like an easy enough diy project, despite the fact that I'm on here asking for help! I have talked to a contractor about it and it will probably cost me another $1000 at least and have to wait for him to do it. The place I priced out the LVL and posts at will sell the stuff to me for less than $200.

Sorry for the late reply and thanks for all the advice!

Kyle

mae-ling 10-04-2012 11:04 AM

Been in S'toon lots, just moved to BC from Star City, 2 Hours North East of you. Lived in Sonningdale Sk before that.
Go to J&H Builders warehouse
2505 Ave C N
Saskatoon, SK S7L 6A6
Tel: (306) 652-5322

Take your info with you, they should be able to hook you up.


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