Moving A Load Bearing Stud - Building & Construction - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-20-2010, 12:00 PM   #16
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,983
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

moving a load bearing stud


A header is a lot of work especially in-place of the top plate, rather than under it..... Why not just add studs under each joist where there is a single top plate?

Be safe, Gary

Advertisement

__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2010, 12:11 PM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

moving a load bearing stud


He said he wanted to open up the area under the stairs
Putting a stud under one of the joists would block that access
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2010, 02:43 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Hagerstown, MD
Posts: 364
Rewards Points: 250
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Well what I really wanted to do was just take out the far left stud and stick a new one under the last ceiling joist. My issue was I did not know how to properly do it, and I also do not know where I would anchor the top of the staircase: if I could do it in the next over ceiling joist (not pictured), or what.
Tonglebeak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2010, 03:14 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 96
Rewards Points: 75
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
Why not just add studs under each joist where there is a single top plate?
Be safe, Gary
I second this.
Put a stud under each joist, lose the crap to the left.
But leave in that stud behind the others that appears to be holding up the staircase. Then take more pics.
Dairylander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2010, 09:50 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Hagerstown, MD
Posts: 364
Rewards Points: 250
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Of couse my mind changed quite a bit and today I finally stuck some studs under there (yes after 4 months, I'm lazy/distracted).



So all I'm really left now are the joists to the right. It wouldn't make sense to stick studs under there (or else there'd be no way to get to the stairs), and there is only 6ft of headroom _without_ a header.

You can see one of the joists in the pic, and then there's..2 more to the right of it, all nailed to an old rim joist. (the joist in the top right is nailed to the _side_ of this rim joist, as pictured earlier in this topic).

To me, it would see adequate to stick one more stud, under that 3rd joist. The problem is, the stairway rail is directly under it. I really don't want to tear it apart, but I presume I don't have any other option. Does anyone else agree?
Tonglebeak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2010, 08:55 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 96
Rewards Points: 75
Default

moving a load bearing stud


You say the rest of the green ceiling joists to the right butt into the rim joist.
If that rim joist is solid and supported, then I would just throw some joist hangers under the green ceiling joists to attach them better to the rim joist and forget about adding more studs.
Dairylander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2010, 01:58 PM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Hagerstown, MD
Posts: 364
Rewards Points: 250
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dairylander View Post
You say the rest of the green ceiling joists to the right butt into the rim joist.
If that rim joist is solid and supported, then I would just throw some joist hangers under the green ceiling joists to attach them better to the rim joist and forget about adding more studs.
That's the problem though. It's not solid and not level. Post #14 has the pics of that joist in question.
Tonglebeak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2010, 01:24 AM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Hagerstown, MD
Posts: 364
Rewards Points: 250
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Pictures are worth a thousand words I guess. Bear with me, these should show a bit more detail into the rest of the problem:

This picture shows where the rim joist changes. It's very obvious. Please note that this appears to "attached" to the right-hand rim joist, by nothing more than a single nail going through the side of the joist, into the end-grain of the right-hand rim joist. If it's attached to the other one...well I don't know. Note that it does not appear to actually be sitting on the trim piece that runs under the joists.



And here is that joist in relation to the staircase banister. The cable line just so happens to draw the line where I want to sit the stud (On top of the 1st floor joist, under the 2nd floor joist that we're questioning):



I guess the only thing stopping me is the fact that I don't know how to cleanly disassemble the banister. I'm also not entirely certain if the right-hand rim joist is tied to the left-hand rim joist. If so, I may be in a world of hurt if I cut the diagonal stud that runs under the banister, and is tied to a 1x that is next to the new stud in the picture. Who knows if it's carrying a load or not lol.

I'm hoping to stick a stud under there and use it to jack up that joist just a bit (it causes a sag that runs parallel between joists). I'm going to be fighting some old wood though: the joist to the right (not visible) is twisted. Guess it happened over time since the joist I want to shove a stud under, isn't adequately supported (in my eyes).

So basically, I want to stick a stud (maybe two studs: one for that joist, and the other for the old rim joist to level that out) where the banister runs. Dig?

Last edited by Tonglebeak; 06-29-2010 at 01:28 AM.
Tonglebeak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2010, 09:48 PM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Hagerstown, MD
Posts: 364
Rewards Points: 250
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Anyone?
Tonglebeak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2010, 11:38 AM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Hagerstown, MD
Posts: 364
Rewards Points: 250
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Well in any case, I screwed a 2x4 block to the underside of the joist (poor drill bit). Stuck another block on the floor (very close to its midspan support, so I'm good here), and start driving a stud up to jack the joist. Things are slowly leveling out, just gotta figure out how to make it permanent in the end.
Tonglebeak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2010, 03:31 PM   #26
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,983
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Just cut back the floor joists enough to attach a header joist above the banister bearing at the last new stud and the landing wall. Double it if needed then add hangers to the floor joists. The pieced rim would stay (alongside) with the new double on the joist side.

Be safe, Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2010, 04:03 PM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Hagerstown, MD
Posts: 364
Rewards Points: 250
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Ah, yes I understand what you're saying. Will just need to temp support the 3 joists then correct?
Tonglebeak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2010, 04:49 PM   #28
Mod
 
kwikfishron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kansas (NCK)
Posts: 7,811
Rewards Points: 2,524
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonglebeak View Post
Ah, yes I understand what you're saying. Will just need to temp support the 3 joists then correct?
Yep.
__________________
A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words
Especially In The DIY Chatroom
kwikfishron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2010, 06:41 PM   #29
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Hagerstown, MD
Posts: 364
Rewards Points: 250
Default

moving a load bearing stud


Awesome. One final question before I do this:

It's going to be a little over 6 and a half feet from bearing point to bearing point. Will a single 2x8 sufficiently carry two joists (after looking carefully, the 3rd joist is actually held up by the exterior wall, so that's one less to worry about), or is doubling the way to go for sure? Thanks.
Tonglebeak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2010, 09:40 PM   #30
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,983
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

moving a load bearing stud


1. What load is above the pieced rim? Another stairs/wall, or stairs/pickets?
2. What is the span of the soon-to-be-shortened-for hangered joists?
3. Are there any point loads on those joists?

Be safe, Gary

Advertisement

__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
damaged load bearing stud, next to a window danf01 Carpentry 1 10-12-2009 07:02 AM
Moving studs on load bearing wall for HVAC? grouse Building & Construction 1 08-20-2009 03:16 PM
Moving Load Bearing wall in Basement iqkhn Remodeling 4 04-05-2009 05:53 PM
Cutting a stud on load bearing wall timw Remodeling 5 01-12-2009 02:55 PM
moving another load bearing nailfun Carpentry 2 02-20-2007 09:10 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts