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-   -   Moving a House 70 miles- Practical? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/moving-house-70-miles-practical-32549/)

GOTHICrevivalRULES 11-24-2008 05:45 PM

Moving a House 70 miles- Practical?
 
I'm a first time homebuyer, and I've always LOVED Gothic revival/Victorian architecture. There is an abandoned house about 70 miles from me, assuming I could buy it, how much would it cost to move 70 miles? And what are my options? Could they move it in pieces? To where I could re-do the entire inside but have them put the outside back together? Here's a pic of the house:
http://flickr.com/photos/22958680@N05/2576039939/
Is this at all feasible?
Thanks for any help/advice!

Gary_602z 11-24-2008 06:02 PM

I think it would be cheaper to build one.:) You would have to pay the power and phone companies to move lines and the brick would probably be coming apart. Just the cost of the moving company would be way up there also ,If you could find anybody to do it.

Gary

bjbatlanta 11-24-2008 06:02 PM

Anything can be done. That said, it will likely depend on your budget. Whether you move 7 or 70 miles, I'm sure it depends on "degree of difficulty" from getting the required permits, getting the house "on wheels", to re-setting it on a foundation. I've seen them moved in pieces. And the brick won't go along with the move........ so you're looking at re-doing the outside too. Is the property not available with the house?? Move in and restore it! If you can get the house for "little or nothing" it might be worth trying to move it. Look in the yellow pages for a house mover and get a quote.

GOTHICrevivalRULES 11-24-2008 06:06 PM

Thanks for the replies so far guys. I wanted to do this because I didn't think you could still build a house like this- can you? If it's possible to build one like this, that would definitely be easier. And the house is in a really bad area, which is why I wouldn't want to leave it where it is.

bjbatlanta 11-24-2008 06:22 PM

Again, with the right budget, a custom builder could build you a house very much like the one in the picture. Understand your reluctance to "move in". I don't think Gary602z realized that the brick on a house is just a "veneer". It is actually independent of the framing of the house other than some aluminum "brick ties" tacked here and there to the studs and set into the mortar. The brick is actually set on a footing independent of the house. It would have to be removed before the house is moved. You could possibly re-use much of it, but it would be rather costly compared to new brick. The brick would have to be taken down with care and the old mortar removed before it could be used again. It's just a matter of $$$$$$ either way.

Shamus 11-25-2008 12:36 PM

Not trying to nit-pick just as a reference to my area here in Ohio and Western Pennsylvania.

I don't know where that house is located but in comparison, my area has many like it. All build around the late 1880's to 1915 era. The foundation's are cut stone 16-24" wide and typically a foot high and 3 feet long, all cut and fit, no mortor.

The exterior stone walls are on a mortar sill directly over those stones. So not so much a veneer as those walls actually support the roof. Look at the window sills to get an idea of the mass.

Moving that home would be a nightmare but do-able for a price. I've seen similar ones done in this area. But, 70 miles isn't really going to be affordable for the average pocket. You might look closer around the area you live in to find one similar to buy and rehab. Would save you a bunch overall. And, as mentioned, it can be replicated in new construction, again, pertty costly.

Edit: Just looked at the photo again, It's Mansfield, Oh. Just down the road from me.

Ezekiel 11-25-2008 12:54 PM

Unfortunately building new would be cheaper. The details would add significant cost to new construction. If it were me, I would consider having a shell built in the basic shape you want. Then slowly doing the detail work yourself. But, that's me. Then again, I'm currently building my new house myself.

shtoink 11-25-2008 02:28 PM

Just over a year ago, I moved a small 100 year old wood framed house. We moved it about 50 miles, but about 40 of those miles were by barge. The house was lifted, transported about 3 miles to a barge, barged to an island, transferred to another truck and transported to its final location. This was a HUGE undertaking.

Just the move itself (not counting prepping the house and all the post-move work) cost us about $45,000 Canadian dollars. This house is still a major project for me and the jury is still out as to whether it was "worth it" in terms of dollars and sweat equity.

However, I love old houses and this was a major determining factor in my decision to move the house. I am at work at the moment and don't have a lot of time to discuss this today, but here are a few quick thoughts:

The FIRST thing you should do is have the house inspected by an engineer in order to determine if it is structurally sound enough to withstand a move. If not, don't bother proceeding any further.

Have a soil engineer look at the destination site to determine if it is suitable.

Contact a local house-moving company (do some local research) and discuss your idea with them. They will need to know where the house is to be moved TO. They will measure the house and map out viable routes that can be used to move it. One big cost factor is the number of hydro/utility wires that have to be moved out of the way along the route. Most jurisdictions will charge for the costs of No Parking signage along the route. The destination site for the house needs to be prepped properly for easy access by the movers. You will need to ready a crew to begin building a foundation once the house is set down (the house movers will set the house down on temporary cribbing and steel beams, the foundation is built under the house, and then the house movers return and set the house down on the foundation).

Find out from local building permit authorities any issues regarding "moved-on structures". Have an inspector look at the house and find out what would need to be brought up to code after the move. Some jurisdictions may allow some things to be "grandfathered in". The work required after the move should not be underestimated.

The house you are considering moving is brick. My house is wood. I am sure there are all kinds of issues regarding brick structures that you should consider (weight and potential damage being the two major ones).

I'd be happy to answer any of your questions later, but I gotta go now.

buletbob 11-25-2008 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shtoink (Post 190057)
Just over a year ago, I moved a small 100 year old wood framed house. We moved it about 50 miles, but about 40 of those miles were by barge. The house was lifted, transported about 3 miles to a barge, barged to an island, transferred to another truck and transported to its final location. This was a HUGE undertaking.

Just the move itself (not counting prepping the house and all the post-move work) cost us about $45,000 Canadian dollars. This house is still a major project for me and the jury is still out as to whether it was "worth it" in terms of dollars and sweat equity.

However, I love old houses and this was a major determining factor in my decision to move the house. I am at work at the moment and don't have a lot of time to discuss this today, but here are a few quick thoughts:

The FIRST thing you should do is have the house inspected by an engineer in order to determine if it is structurally sound enough to withstand a move. If not, don't bother proceeding any further.

Have a soil engineer look at the destination site to determine if it is suitable.

Contact a local house-moving company (do some local research) and discuss your idea with them. They will need to know where the house is to be moved TO. They will measure the house and map out viable routes that can be used to move it. One big cost factor is the number of hydro/utility wires that have to be moved out of the way along the route. Most jurisdictions will charge for the costs of No Parking signage along the route. The destination site for the house needs to be prepped properly for easy access by the movers. You will need to ready a crew to begin building a foundation once the house is set down (the house movers will set the house down on temporary cribbing and steel beams, the foundation is built under the house, and then the house movers return and set the house down on the foundation).

Find out from local building permit authorities any issues regarding "moved-on structures". Have an inspector look at the house and find out what would need to be brought up to code after the move. Some jurisdictions may allow some things to be "grandfathered in". The work required after the move should not be underestimated.

The house you are considering moving is brick. My house is wood. I am sure there are all kinds of issues regarding brick structures that you should consider (weight and potential damage being the two major ones).

I'd be happy to answer any of your questions later, but I gotta go now.


SHTOINK I do believe I remember discussing with you some sort of soffit details Back a ways, How did it turn out. BOB

Joe F 11-25-2008 03:28 PM

The picture looks to me like it used to be a church.

shtoink 11-25-2008 03:31 PM

It worked out very well, thanks to your advice, BOB.

Thanks again.

My project is slooooooooowly coming along. I only have weekends to do the work.

concretemasonry 11-25-2008 03:49 PM

You will never be able to re-create the quality and materials of a true old victorian today. The modern shopper, builder or "flipper" may not notice the difference in quality and details, but the people wanting a real Victorian will know the difference if and when you sell.

We just had a church moved over 100 miles without any problems or major damage.

When you move, the major problems are getting the house up, getting a good foundation and setting it in place. The distance is not as important if you can avoid freeways and bridges. Check with a reputable house mover to see what the price is and let him seek the best methods/routes, which will determine the cost. - You might be surprised.

4just1don 11-25-2008 11:28 PM

last time I wanted to 'move' something,,I saw this very large cable overhead,,,the company wanted 50,000 buckarooes IN a cash account untouchable by me,,,to be 'certain' I didnt touch that cable!!!

Check and count how MANY wires potentially have to be lowered,,then ask how much PER wire and the answer might be right in front of your eyes!!! MOST wires cant be sticked with a two story house such as that. probably 25' or MORE high,plus add 3 or 4 more for trailer height and a few for saftey factor and your above the very tallest ones for sure!!!

In 30-40 years of 'watching' houses moved, remodeled and reused,,,,havent seen a profitable one yet,,,generally ALL costs added together exceeds value,,big time.(and I havent seen a BRICK one moved yet). time involved is also critical,,like flipping,,,time eats you alive!!! Its noble,but profitable,,or even affordable,,,havent seen one yet!!! AND if thats in a bad area,,how you gonna get it out of there without getting vandaled etc??(wire and copper stripped,,,plus anything else good or valuable ???)

Arther 11-26-2008 04:30 AM

I Moved my house . The building was of 1946 construction and remains 55’ long by 34’ wide. The structure weighed some 225 tons (450,000#), roughly half a million pounds, the two story, brick veneer structure had to be moved some 165’ from its original lot to another contiguous property and raised some 20’ higher than it had been.
here is the picture of this move.
http://wolfehousebuildingmovers.com/pastjob.html

buletbob 11-26-2008 05:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shtoink (Post 190075)
It worked out very well, thanks to your advice, BOB.

Thanks again.

My project is slooooooooowly coming along. I only have weekends to do the work.

I'm glade it all worked out for you. Good luck BOB


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