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Old 09-20-2006, 10:50 PM   #16
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Monolithic forming...


I'm thinking of using 1x to tie the panel tops together instead of the formed spreader clips/cleats. That will allow me to put a whaler flush with the top of the panels with out interference from the clips. I'm thinking I can also drill the 1x to suspend my j-bolts through and locate accordingly.

Thanks Ken and hammer, the feedback is reasuring!

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Old 09-20-2006, 11:44 PM   #17
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Monolithic forming...


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I'm thinking of using 1x to tie the panel tops together instead of the formed spreader clips/cleats. That will allow me to put a whaler flush with the top of the panels with out interference from the clips. I'm thinking I can also drill the 1x to suspend my j-bolts through and locate accordingly.

Thanks Ken and hammer, the feedback is reasuring!
There is never any reason to set the top whaler to the top of the form. You could if it works out better for you but a few things to consider. To pour to the top of the form you will have to get all this formwork perfectly level. If you are going to try to shim it level you might be ok if your shims arn't too big. I'm just wondering if you might start floating.

The normal way for me to do this would be to use a panel higher than you need and snap a level line inside the form, (like you discused in post #1). Then the forms can be out of level or whatever. Then I would put finish nails on the line and pour to the nails. Or the more common practice around here, I would set the redwood sill to the line with the j bolts countersunk and hanging down into the form. Then just pour to the top of the redwood sill. If that is not a common practice in your area it might be too hard to explain to an inspector and you might have some trouble getting the stiff mud to flow by the sill.

I'm just throwing out some options. I'm all for your way if you can get that length of form to sit perfectly level.

You'll need to lay out your sill lengths so you have a j bolt close to the end of each sill board.
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Old 09-21-2006, 12:28 AM   #18
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Monolithic forming...


I have this bad pre-disposition from years as a machinist. You would laugh if you new the time and precision I have into making the footing forms. They are level to near a 1/4" using a sight level, I finally gave up.

I sure like your idea about the sill and j-bolts, I will check that out with a local tradesman or inspector.

Thanks!
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Old 09-21-2006, 09:07 AM   #19
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Monolithic forming...


You might want to check and see how stiff or what slump the pumper will pump. I don't pour much anymore but when I did the guys wouldn't go below a 5 inch slump through the pump. 5 inch is pretty free flowing. A 4 or a 3 is probably more what you need on the bottom form. Might be worth a little investigation.
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Old 09-21-2006, 01:17 PM   #20
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Monolithic forming...


Is it ok to weld at all on the rebar?

I see nothing about "welding" in any of codes. Sure would be easy (for me) to simply "tack" the j-bolts to one of the top horizontal rebar runs.

What is prefered for attaching whalers to the plywood panels?

I was going to use 2 1/2" screws from inside the panels.

Last edited by MLO; 09-21-2006 at 01:24 PM.
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Old 09-21-2006, 05:29 PM   #21
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Monolithic forming...


We welded rebar on a commercial job once but I think that was special bar. Generally you don't want any heat on the bar, (not allowed to bend it with a torch)... I'm not really sure.

If I understand it correctly your tab on your mono strap will be securing the plywood but not actually attached to the whaler. If that is the case I like your idea with the screws. Normally when the whaler is secured it takes very little to hold the plywood to the whaler. I wouldn't want to be pouring 8 ft of wall with your mono system but for 16 in you should be ok.

Good to ask questions. I asked some questions years ago on a big pour and it saved me about 12K.
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Old 09-21-2006, 10:56 PM   #22
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Monolithic forming...


You are correct about the "tab" on the mono-strap/cleat. It is simply a 90deg. bent tab that is 1 inch tall with a hole in it.

I was going to run whalers just above the tabs and flush with the top of the panels. Panels are 8' and I will stagger the whaler and panel joints.

Mr. Engineer called out for these siesmic holdowns (PHD5's) that mount inside of the wall corner double stud. They use a 5/8" threaded rod that runs through sole, subflloor, floorjoist, sill and 11 inches into foundation. The Simpson catalouge shows the rod installed before pouring, my plans call out for the install to be drilled 11 inches into the foundation and epoxied in. A bathtub fitting (PHD5) has a hole in the bottom that fits over the threaded rod and is nutted, then bolted to the corner double stud via 10 lag screws. Seems I could install either way and be safe? drilling through everything does not sound fun!
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Old 09-21-2006, 11:26 PM   #23
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Monolithic forming...


I can't help on siesmic hardware but maybe some from the west coast will jump in here. HS
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Old 09-22-2006, 10:27 AM   #24
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Do I really need to be concerned with any type of release agent on the plywood forms for a single use?
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Old 09-22-2006, 10:33 AM   #25
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Do I really need to be concerned with any type of release agent on the plywood forms for a single use?
No. They will peel off nicely. The concrete will have a nice wood grain. Good questions!!
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Old 09-22-2006, 10:47 AM   #26
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Monolithic forming...


Indeed, you can even stain the concrete for a nice 'wood' finish. I have seen people spray on diesel fuel if they don't have the 'expensive' stuff. Like HS said though, typically they come off pretty good.
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Old 09-22-2006, 10:49 AM   #27
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Monolithic forming...


I used alot of 1/2" osb for forms with extra whalers. Osb has that shinny side that makes nice wall. It would probably be a little tricky with your mono strap. Osb is down to 8 bucks a sheet. 3/4 ply ??

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