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-   -   Measurments for purchased plans. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/measurments-purchased-plans-69218/)

Axe McGee 04-17-2010 09:40 AM

Measurments for purchased plans.
 
I bought some plans for a 16x20ft shed from a website. I get to the truss construction page and find it has measurements as fine as 21/64ths...? in wood working really?

So the measurements are for the angles of the truss' but it also has in there the angles in degrees. Is there a better way to work the dimension? Is to the 64th really necessary? If not what dim. can I take it to?

I'm almost done with this project, in between college, baby, and wife. It has taken me about 5 days if i total all my time up, working by myself. I 'll get some photos posted when I'm done.

vsheetz 04-17-2010 11:56 AM

If the plan is truly describing a truss structure, the intention is for the information to be provided to a company who builds the trusses for you. They are then delivered onsite and you erect them on the walls. Having done both stick building and trusses, trusses are a great way to go, IMHO. And I think you will find the pricing of having them built is reasonable.

Big Bob 04-17-2010 12:37 PM

OP, if you can advise the description of gussett plates (how truss webs are joined) on your plans we can advise if this is DIY or a truss plant layout.:thumbsup:

Know that engineered trusses are built to tight dementions to transfer loads properly.:yes:

If you have permit and inspections..this could be very important to you.:whistling2::yes:

Axe McGee 04-17-2010 09:58 PM

They have on the plans to cut the gusset plates out of 1/2" plywood to the dimm. they specify. There are 4 diffrent types of gusset plates they are showing being used on the truss set up.
Sadly when I purchased the lumber for this I purchased enough for the trusses, I should have thought ahead and had them prefabed and delivered...

The prefab truss idea actually makes sense now, with the close tolerance they are showing.

Thanks

vsheetz 04-17-2010 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Axe McGee (Post 430027)
They have on the plans to cut the gusset plates out of 1/2" plywood to the dimm. they specify. There are 4 diffrent types of gusset plates they are showing being used on the truss set up.
Sadly when I purchased the lumber for this I purchased enough for the trusses, I should have thought ahead and had them prefabed and delivered...

The prefab truss idea actually makes sense now, with the close tolerance they are showing.

Thanks

Maybe some ideas that will help. Does the place you purchased lumber also do trusses - maybe they will swap and provide you a credit. Sell the lumber on Craigslist. See if a truss maker will do a swap.

Big Bob 04-17-2010 10:29 PM

Sounds like a DIY plan... try playing with some scrap wood... see if you can get the right angle.. once you get it right..you will have a templet to work from... try making a truss.. odds are you will do fine...as long as they are all the same..and tight... your shed roof will look great. :thumbsup:

or toss the plans and stick build the roof frameing..
or you could have a truss plant make some... tell them you want gable trusses for a 16 X 20 with ( advise desired roof pitch) they will fix you up..:)

troubleseeker 04-17-2010 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Axe McGee (Post 429825)
measurements as fine as 21/64ths...? in wood working really?

Only in the mind of the computer :laughing:. These dimensions are automatically calculated by the CAD program the designer was using.
I always get a good chuckle every time I review a set of plans for the first time and see 1/64" dimensions:yes:. Since your tape measure in 1/16" increments, anything smaller than this is meaningless, unless you plan on building with an enginer's scale.
It is a pretty big leap of faith to extend an angle measured with a protractor out to half of a 16' truss, so you will need to calculate the height at the centerline of the truss. This can be done with a construction calculator...or makes a good exercise for a family member who is in high school geometry or trig.

Axe McGee 04-18-2010 08:56 AM

thanks for the help gang. I'm gonna go out this afternoon and ponder what my next move is.
Like I said I'll get some photos posted.


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