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Old 01-02-2012, 01:27 AM   #1
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Max weight load for ceiling


I have a ~45-50 yr old home, and would like to add multiple layers of drywall to a basement ceiling. The room is approx. 12x20
and I'd like to put 4 layers of 5/8" drywall (part of sound containment) - of course the screws connecting to the joists would be approx. 16" apart.
Can the ceiling hold the weight without problem? (for obvious reasons please only answer if you're sure)

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Old 01-02-2012, 02:16 AM   #2
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Max weight load for ceiling


While we wait for our diviners to arrive:

From the way sound waves travel (and stop travelling) you should get the same sound insulation out of 1-1/2" rigid foam plus 1/2" drywall.

By the time you get to screwing the fourth layer of drywall (with 3" screws), you'll have a hard time finding room in the joists to screw into.

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Old 01-02-2012, 07:44 AM   #3
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Max weight load for ceiling


I've checked that
Given that, what's the max amount of drywall,weight load I can evenly distribute without fear
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Old 01-02-2012, 08:34 AM   #4
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Max weight load for ceiling


I dont know where you live but if you have a Lowes near you they sell sound reducing drywall. Its called queitrock. You will probably only need one layer of it.
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Old 01-02-2012, 09:15 AM   #5
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Max weight load for ceiling


Standard weight drywall is approximately 2 pounds per square foot for a 5/8 inch thick sheet. Four sheets would be 8 psf. Without exact details of the construction of your basement ceiling, including measured size of joists, spacing, type of lumber, type of connections,other loads on the basement, allowable deflection, it is impossible for anyone on this forum, or anywhere else, to tell you the maximum additional load you can put on your ceiling. And, for obvious reasons, anyone that is certain about the answer without such knowledge is a fool, and you already stated you don't want advice from a fool.
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Old 01-02-2012, 09:51 AM   #6
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Max weight load for ceiling


Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
Standard weight drywall is approximately 2 pounds per square foot for a 5/8 inch thick sheet. Four sheets would be 8 psf. Without exact details of the construction of your basement ceiling, including measured size of joists, spacing, type of lumber, type of connections,other loads on the basement, allowable deflection, it is impossible for anyone on this forum, or anywhere else, to tell you the maximum additional load you can put on your ceiling. And, for obvious reasons, anyone that is certain about the answer without such knowledge is a fool, and you already stated you don't want advice from a fool.

thanks I appreciate that honesty.
WHat I know is
joists are 16" apart.
House is approx. 50 years old
room size is 10x20'
Other than a finsihed ceiling throughout almost all of the basement, there's no other load on the ceiling

those are the answers that I know, does it narrow it down enough that even with the remaining variables it's ok, or is this amount borderline and something to hold off on.
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Old 01-02-2012, 11:46 PM   #7
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Max weight load for ceiling


Quote:
Originally Posted by cgott42

thanks I appreciate that honesty.
WHat I know is
joists are 16" apart.
House is approx. 50 years old
room size is 10x20'
Other than a finsihed ceiling throughout almost all of the basement, there's no other load on the ceiling

those are the answers that I know, does it narrow it down enough that even with the remaining variables it's ok, or is this amount borderline and something to hold off on.
What size are the joists (2x4, 2x6, etc.). Do you have engineered trusses, or "stick built" framing?
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:31 AM   #8
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Max weight load for ceiling


Quote:
Originally Posted by cgott42 View Post
thanks I appreciate that honesty.
WHat I know is
joists are 16" apart.
House is approx. 50 years old
room size is 10x20'
Other than a finsihed ceiling throughout almost all of the basement, there's no other load on the ceiling

those are the answers that I know, does it narrow it down enough that even with the remaining variables it's ok, or is this amount borderline and something to hold off on.
I'm curious to know why you think that you need so much drywall.

I don't think you'll get a clear, trustworthy answer here. Other than the size of the joists, you need to know their span and, most unknown and important of all, how much weight they are already supporting from the floor above (most probably your ceiling joists are also the floor joists of the room above, if we are talking about a regular basement).
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:52 AM   #9
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Max weight load for ceiling


Thanks, see that I'll need a pro to look at it b4 I do anything.
thx
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:59 AM   #10
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Max weight load for ceiling


Have you done tests, first, to see if multiple layers of drywall will indeed be ideal (considering time, cost and effort) to hamper sound?

I'd consider applying light-weight wall foams and such products that are designed for sound absorption from the get-go. . . and while you're on that product-purchasing path you'll find some good articles and info that explain the ups and downs of sound-proofing and why some methods don't work and some do.

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