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Old 10-21-2013, 02:41 PM   #1
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Max load on an i-beam


Hello,

Could someone tell me what would be the max load (uniformly distributed) an i-beam 8x4@15.8# 16ft long would be able to support ?

Thank you

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Old 10-21-2013, 04:36 PM   #2
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Max load on an i-beam


Welcome to the Forum!

do you mean a steel beam or solid sawn wood? what does 8x4@15.8# mean?

what are you attempting to accomplish?

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Old 10-21-2013, 04:55 PM   #3
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Max load on an i-beam


It is a steel i-beam 16 ft long with those parameters (from the original blueprints) running through the middle of the house. I want to know what is the max weight it is supposed to support ?
I understand that 8 x 4 @ 15.8# for an i-beam means it has a Depth=8", Flange Width=4" and a Weight/ft=15.8lb

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Old 10-21-2013, 05:09 PM   #4
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Max load on an i-beam


I have never heard of a steel beam identified with that nomenclature. Does not mean it could not have been expressed as that, it is just not the norm in my experience.

Steel beams are normally listed with the shape (W,S,M,HP, etc.), the depth of the beam and weight per foot. For example W8x15 would be a W-shape, with a depth of 8-1/8" and a weight of 15 lbs per lineal foot.

Beams are designed to carry the weight of the building materials and anticipated live loads such as people and furniture, things than can easily change that they must support.

Hopefully someone more knowledgeable that I will chime in.

Why are you needing this information? What are you attempting to accomplish?
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Old 10-21-2013, 05:31 PM   #5
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Max load on an i-beam


Want to place some cabinets along that beam (int the attic). It supports my ceiling . Want to know how much weight it can take. The ceiling is made of 8'x4' cemestos panels 2" thick (~260lb each).

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Old 10-21-2013, 05:35 PM   #6
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Max load on an i-beam


if it was my place I'd retain the services of a professional engineer that performs building design to determine if my beam was capable of handling the additional loads.

An internet chat forum is not the place to get structural design. I know the price is good, but as per my signature "you get what you pay for, and sometime free costs more."

The engineer will need to visit your building and see for themselves the existing conditions and determine the size and capacity of the existing beam.

I know this is not what you want to hear, but it's what you need to hear.

Good luck!
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Old 10-21-2013, 07:21 PM   #7
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Max load on an i-beam


Mr. Brackins is correct, in the United States I beams are either W (wide flange) or S (standard) shapes. There could be some sort of ancient naming system on your plans, or you are reading the plans incorrectly. I suggest you carefully measure the beam. The dimensions required are the depth, width of the flange, thickness of the web, and thickness of the flange. These are measured in inches, and you really need to measure very carefully, as thicknesses are typically measured to the 1/32 of an inch. Post the dimensions of the shape, and I can tell you what you have.
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Old 10-22-2013, 08:39 AM   #8
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Max load on an i-beam


Might be wide of the mark here, but the size quoted by the OP exactly corresponds to a UK (B.S.) standard beam, except that the size/weight is in SI units - 203 x 102 x 23. The last figure is the weight in kg/m, which would be around 15.8 1bs/ft.
I might be wrong - perhaps there is an old US beam that size?
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Old 10-22-2013, 12:44 PM   #9
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Max load on an i-beam


Tony is probably right. House is in Canada, built around 1954.
The beam is boxed-in so I can't see/measure it.
The '8 x 4 I beam 15.8#" is exactly what is written on the original building plan.
What would that be able to support ?
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Old 10-22-2013, 12:59 PM   #10
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Max load on an i-beam


you may want to edit your profile to include your location. many times answers to questions are based upon location.
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Old 10-22-2013, 06:32 PM   #11
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Max load on an i-beam


Hi Tony.

I can't post a PM yet but I got your message and it's exactly what I was looking for.

Thanks a lot,
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Old 10-24-2013, 10:55 AM   #12
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Max load on an i-beam


Looks like it's close to a W8x15 (W200x22)

Is your attic developed as a living space?
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Old 10-24-2013, 09:58 PM   #13
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Max load on an i-beam


No, not as a living space.

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