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Old 02-26-2011, 09:07 PM   #1
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Max horizontal load on vertical basement support beam


I have a horizontal wooden beam running across the whole basement. It is supported by the concrete walls at the end of the house, and two vertical support beams inside the basement. I don't know what the internal beams are made out of because they are covered with wooden frames. Banging the frames makes a questionable sound so I am not sure if the frames are attached to the support beams. The internal vertical support beams with frames measure 9" by 9" (look like rectangular prism). I have resistance bands that I want to wrap around one of the internal support beams. These are the bands: http://www.amazon.com/Bodylastics-Re...8771488&sr=8-1


Connecting all the bands will hypothetically require me to pull with 388 pounds of force, so a maximum of 388 pounds of horizontal force on the vertical support beam. Realistically, I am not strong enough to pull with 388 pounds, and some exercises have me pulling the bands at an angle (bands connected at the top and pulling down, ect) so some of the force will be vertical. Currently I am pulling 120 lbs, and there isn't and creaking or damage visible/heard. The bands are held by a 1.5 inch wide attachment wrapped around the whole beam.

Wooden house. Basement and first floor built in the 1950s, 6 years ago everything was renovated and a second floor + attic was added.

So what is the maximum amount of horizontal force that I can pull on this internal vertical support beam?

Thanks.

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Last edited by supa; 02-26-2011 at 09:17 PM.
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Old 02-26-2011, 11:47 PM   #2
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I really have no clue as to what you're trying to accomplish.
Was this addition drawn by an architect?
Weren't the new loads compensated for?
Take some pictures.
Ron

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Old 02-27-2011, 08:57 AM   #3
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Old 02-27-2011, 09:17 AM   #4
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the wooden columns are probably hollow and decorative. probably a metal support column inside. not sure how much lateral pull you can use , i would think not much
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Old 02-27-2011, 09:20 AM   #5
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So worst case scenario is that the decorative columns break/crack and house doesn't come crashing down?
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Old 02-27-2011, 09:24 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supa View Post
So worst case scenario is that the decorative columns break/crack and house doesn't come crashing down?
assuming under post is properly fastened
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Old 02-27-2011, 12:01 PM   #7
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I think that IF you are Superman you might be able to accidentally pull the post out but being a mere mortal, not likely.

So exercise away I say.

Andy.
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Old 02-27-2011, 02:41 PM   #8
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Then again, the MDF might just be toe-nailed....... not enough for a 100# pull on two vertical corners at mid-height.

Gary
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Old 02-27-2011, 02:51 PM   #9
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It's a decorative post. I'd find another area to attach it to.
But if it breaks, you know where to come for DIY fix it advice.
It's a win, win situation.
Ron

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