DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   LVLs pre ripped? and proper hangers? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/lvls-pre-ripped-proper-hangers-138557/)

Velvis 03-28-2012 03:13 PM

LVLs pre ripped? and proper hangers?
 
I need about a dozen 2x8 LVLs ripped down to 6.5" Is there a place to order them pre ripped?

Also I am familar with strongtie joist hangers for regular wood, is there a specific product for LVLs?


Thank you.

sixeightten 03-28-2012 03:19 PM

Table saw would work well for site ripping a bunch of them. I am sure the lumber yard can do it, but you will pay through the nose. Simpson has a full line of hangers that will fit the lvl's.

Velvis 03-28-2012 03:36 PM

Thanks for the tips.
Do you know if LVLs available in 4x8? and could those be ripped with an ordinary table saw?

sixeightten 03-28-2012 03:41 PM

I think you would have to special order those. We have used 4x lvl on a few occasions. A 10" table saw will rip those no problem.

woodworkbykirk 03-28-2012 08:29 PM

we rip lvl's all the time, either to match them up to existing joists on reno's or to make them the same width as the ojt's or tji's . lvls rarely come the exact same dimension as joist material

as for 4x lvl.. never seen it we either laminate them or switch to either glulam or microlam

AtlanticWBConst. 03-29-2012 05:02 AM

Use a skill saw with a good blade. That's how it is done on framing/build sites.

For the novice, use a skill saw with a rip-fence to keep the cut straight. Example: http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/Pro...aspx?SKU=22216

Joe Carola 03-29-2012 06:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Velvis
I need about a dozen 2x8 LVLs ripped down to 6.5" Is there a place to order them pre ripped?

Also I am familar with strongtie joist hangers for regular wood, is there a specific product for LVLs?

Thank you.

What are you using these for?

Velvis 03-29-2012 02:59 PM

I am redoing a bathroom and replacing a standard cast iron tub with a corner unit whirlpool.
The existing beams are 4x3's (the house is over 100 years old) and there is only 6.5" of space to fit new joists.

A carpenter friend suggested the LVL's another friend suggested an engineer to decide whats needed.

AtlanticWBConst. 03-29-2012 03:49 PM

More information here Joe: http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/whats...gineer-138660/

Duckweather 03-29-2012 04:06 PM

I believe I have seen 6 inch microlams, (& others) and you could add 1/2" plywood to build up. Of course this all depends on how far you are spanning. All the "according to Hoyle" carpenters / engineers will want you to use some elaborate method to over build I'm sure, due to FOL, (fear of lawsuits). If it is your house, and you are taking out something that passed code long ago, any engineered lumber is probably twice as strong as what you are taking out. I have been told that they will break before they bend much, and quite suddenly. Most lumber yards will have span ratings in the manufacturers literature, and some manufacturers will do calculations for the lumber yard for free. It is structural so be careful. If in doubt-DON'T DO IT

Ironlight 03-29-2012 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Velvis (Post 887989)
I am redoing a bathroom and replacing a standard cast iron tub with a corner unit whirlpool.
The existing beams are 4x3's (the house is over 100 years old) and there is only 6.5" of space to fit new joists.

A carpenter friend suggested the LVL's another friend suggested an engineer to decide whats needed.

If the spa unit is going be heavier than the old tub (and if it is a larger volume than the old tub, be sure to include in your calculation the weight of the water it will hold) then it is probably a good idea to get a structural engineer to specify what you will need to support it. Don't for get that the issue is not just what you need for beams but also the support provided to those beams going all the way down to the foundation.

All that said, old iron tubs are heavy as sin and if this is bathtub-sized spa then I'd be fairly certain that you're coming out even or even ahead on weight and can just go with sizing new beams to at least the dimensions of the old.

Why exactly are you contemplating LVLs for this? Why can't you use standard lumber?

woodworkbykirk 03-29-2012 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duckweather (Post 888025)
I believe I have seen 6 inch microlams, (& others) and you could add 1/2" plywood to build up. Of course this all depends on how far you are spanning. All the "according to Hoyle" carpenters / engineers will want you to use some elaborate method to over build I'm sure, due to FOL, (fear of lawsuits). If it is your house, and you are taking out something that passed code long ago, any engineered lumber is probably twice as strong as what you are taking out. I have been told that they will break before they bend much, and quite suddenly. Most lumber yards will have span ratings in the manufacturers literature, and some manufacturers will do calculations for the lumber yard for free. It is structural so be careful. If in doubt-DON'T DO IT

using plywood as a build up for a engineered beam is a major no no.. this will not pass an inspection.. if you have to build up a beam by shimming it must be steel plate stock

Velvis 03-29-2012 06:23 PM

According to the manufacturer the tub is just under 1000 lbs full; (like 980) its a corner unit 60x60. The old tub was a standard 60" cast iron tub which from research I estimated about 650 lbs full. (300 for the tub 350 for water). So the new tub is more. However is will span multiple joists where as the old tub rested on one and that one was rotted out to the point of resting on a wall below. How it all didnt fall in is amazing.

LVLs were suggested as I only have 6.5" of clearance so the biggest standard lumber would be a 2x6. (which would be a 5.5"). He said get 2x8 lvls and rip them to 6.5"

The span is 81"

Ironlight 03-29-2012 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Velvis (Post 888108)
LVLs were suggested as I only have 6.5" of clearance so the biggest standard lumber would be a 2x6. (which would be a 5.5"). He said get 2x8 lvls and rip them to 6.5"

The span is 81"

I would just get 2x8 standard lumber and rip it down to the size you need. I don't believe that you need any of the specific qualities of engineered beams for this application.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:35 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved