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Old 07-17-2012, 11:01 PM   #1
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I am doing a gut and remodel on a 3,000 sq ft home and part of the project is to remove a load bearing wall to open up the space. The span will be 30 ft and I cant have any supports. The load is the upstairs floor and presumably the roof. Our snow load can be tremendous as well as there is a wind issue as we live in Wyoming. My question is what size lvl will be suitable for this application.
Thanks Michael.

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Old 07-17-2012, 11:13 PM   #2
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If you can't have any supports, then your answer is no LVL.

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Old 07-17-2012, 11:16 PM   #3
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No one here had better even guess on this one.
Time to call an engineer.
Are they trusses or stick build rafters?
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Old 07-18-2012, 01:00 AM   #4
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30' is a long span for and beam.
Get an engineer
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Old 07-18-2012, 07:18 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
No one here had better even guess on this one.
Time to call an engineer.
Are they trusses or stick build rafters?

The rafters are stick built but the beam is under the second floor there are other load bearing affairs in this house, the thing is just being held up with a 2x4 wall now I would think that a large LVL. or gluelam would be ok. I really need help with this.
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Old 07-18-2012, 07:21 AM   #6
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Quote:
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If you can't have any supports, then your answer is no LVL.


How about a glulam????
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Old 07-18-2012, 07:59 AM   #7
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You are going to need drawings and sign off to change structure so as suggested you really should call a structural engineer or architect to spec this right for you. Nothing against posts here but you do not want to trust your home to us without us seeing the site, doing our own measurements and so forth. Their are numerous beam calculators online that will give you a rough idea of what you will need and the cost.
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Old 07-20-2012, 06:31 PM   #8
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I agree, call a local professional engineer that specializes in residential construction. 30' is a very long span without any supports. You're certainly looking at a steel beam, which will require an engineer's review and certification as the building code does not provide span tables for steel beams.

sdsester if absolutely correct, do not entrust the safety of your home and family to online forums when it comes to sizing structural elements. You may get an answer you like, but may not love the results.

Good luck!
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Old 07-20-2012, 06:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amoroso

now I would think that a large LVL. or gluelam would be ok. I really need help with this.
You really think that...huh? How about stop ignoring the advice you have received about getting an engineer and just call one. You have no other choice. No one here can answer this for you . Do you understand? Or are you going to keep talking about it and not listening.
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Old 07-20-2012, 06:55 PM   #10
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Sketch up a floor plan to scale. Bring it to a decent lumber yard that sells glulams and other engineered lumber, and have their engineer spec it out for you. Once that is done, bring the plans to your local building inspector. There is no other way to do this.
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Old 07-20-2012, 07:36 PM   #11
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LVL or Glulam

Didn't you already get all the answers you need in this other thread? If you're not gonna listen to any of the guys on here in either of the threads, why don't you just try the 30 ft beam and let us know how it worked out?
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Old 07-20-2012, 07:41 PM   #12
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LVL or Glulam

Didn't you already get all the answers you need in this other thread? If you're not gonna listen to any of the guys on here in either of the threads, why don't you just try the 30 ft beam and let us know how it worked out?
Didn't realize it was the same guy. He deserves no help at all for this.
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Old 07-20-2012, 07:50 PM   #13
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30' span is ridiculous. Even getting steel to span that would probably require a 24" tall beam. I don't think we have ever spanned more than 20' with any lvl or glue lam.
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Old 07-20-2012, 07:53 PM   #14
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What scares me in the other thread is this part:

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the home owner wants it (the wall) removed
Does this mean this guy is a contractor who promised the home owner something and now is seeking help on a DIY forum, rather than calling an engineer?

I'd be scared if I was his client.
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Old 07-20-2012, 07:57 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LVDIY
What scares me in the other thread is this part:

Does this mean this guy is a contractor who promised the home owner something and now is seeking help on a DIY forum, rather than calling an engineer?

I'd be scared if I was his client.
That's even worse.

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