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Old 03-10-2013, 12:26 PM   #16
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Load transfer question


It is very common to carry the trimmer studs down to a main beam in the basement rather than all the way to a footer on the floor. The studs are typically connected to the beam using a galvanized bracket made by a company like Simpson. The Simpson catalog includes full details about proper connection technique. If you bring the studs to a footer, you typically need a stand off bracket to keep the studs above the concrete floor, however this method is uncommon. As previously noted, steel or concrete filled still lally columns are generally used in the basement rather than wooden columns.
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Old 03-10-2013, 02:33 PM   #17
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It is very common to carry the trimmer studs down to a main beam in the basement rather than all the way to a footer on the floor. The studs are typically connected to the beam using a galvanized bracket made by a company like Simpson. The Simpson catalog includes full details about proper connection technique. If you bring the studs to a footer, you typically need a stand off bracket to keep the studs above the concrete floor, however this method is uncommon. As previously noted, steel or concrete filled still lally columns are generally used in the basement rather than wooden columns.
and do the king studs remain on the floor where the beam is being placed? Do you mean like a post to beam bracket? Do you have a picture of a stand off bracket? Do you think a 4x4 trimmer is best because they do make post to beam brackets for 4x4s.
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Old 03-10-2013, 04:28 PM   #18
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Load transfer question


Stand off bracket: download the Simpson catalog, there are many different brackets made. You pick the one that carries the appropriate load, and fits the lumber.

Posts: I do not like 4x4 solid posts, they tend to twist. I prefer to use three 2x4 nailed together, one king stud and two trimmers. The king stud typically extends above the header just like a standard wall stud, the trimmers support the header. If you purchase a book on standard framing techniques, they will show you exactly how to make a post this way. There are also some on line documents on framing, check the Forest Products Laboratory website, they have some diagrams. There are brackets made to connect the header to the trimmers, this is particularly important in earthquake county.
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Old 03-10-2013, 05:56 PM   #19
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Stand off bracket: download the Simpson catalog, there are many different brackets made. You pick the one that carries the appropriate load, and fits the lumber.

Posts: I do not like 4x4 solid posts, they tend to twist. I prefer to use three 2x4 nailed together, one king stud and two trimmers. The king stud typically extends above the header just like a standard wall stud, the trimmers support the header. If you purchase a book on standard framing techniques, they will show you exactly how to make a post this way. There are also some on line documents on framing, check the Forest Products Laboratory website, they have some diagrams. There are brackets made to connect the header to the trimmers, this is particularly important in earthquake county.
I looked and don't see any that will attach 2 trimmer studs to to a bracket to attach to the beam. I only see post to beam brackets for 4x4s. Can you look?
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Old 03-10-2013, 05:58 PM   #20
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I looked and don't see any that will attach 2 trimmer studs to to a bracket to attach to the beam. I only see post to beam brackets for 4x4s. Can you look?
Also, by standoffs do you mean post brackets that attach to a footing like you would use on a deck?
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Old 03-10-2013, 06:54 PM   #21
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Load transfer question


The same bracket that works for a 4x4 works for (2) 2x4's.
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Old 03-10-2013, 07:31 PM   #22
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The same bracket that works for a 4x4 works for (2) 2x4's.
4x4's are really 3.5" 2 trimmers would be 3" though.
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Old 03-10-2013, 07:32 PM   #23
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Load transfer question


add 1/2" piece of plywood between that will give you 3-1/2"
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Old 03-10-2013, 07:36 PM   #24
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add 1/2" piece of plywood between that will give you 3-1/2"
and you would bring those 2 trimmers all the way down to the steel i beam? Is that normally what happens instead of bringing them down to the basement floor ?
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Old 03-10-2013, 08:17 PM   #25
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Why don't you go out and buy a book on framing or go to the library? HD or Lowes should have a publication that would help you. The Library is a good free source for information of this type.

If you actually told us specifically what you are trying to accomplish it would be a little easier to answer.
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Old 03-10-2013, 08:27 PM   #26
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maybe i am misunderstanding something here. but it seems to me that the OP "thinks" that trimmers are real load bearing members. that needs to go to a footing or beam. in most cases they don't hold much weight.
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Old 03-10-2013, 08:51 PM   #27
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The term trimmer has several meanings. In this context, it refers to a jack stud (so called because it is shorter than a king stud). Typically there are two jack studs and one king stud making up a post to support a header, so the jack studs (trimmers) actually carry all the weight of the header.
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Old 03-10-2013, 09:18 PM   #28
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The term trimmer has several meanings. In this context, it refers to a jack stud (so called because it is shorter than a king stud). Typically there are two jack studs and one king stud making up a post to support a header, so the jack studs (trimmers) actually carry all the weight of the header.
yes, i understand that. but the header and "typically" what the header is holding up, doesn't weight much. therefor the trimmer/jack doesn't need to have its own footing. in all that i have seen, the jack & king set on the bottom plate.
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:00 AM   #29
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Load transfer question


If all supported properly lolly column in basement to bottom of beam, then 2x4 or 6 depending on your wall above straight up,
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Old 03-11-2013, 07:36 AM   #30
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maybe i am misunderstanding something here. but it seems to me that the OP "thinks" that trimmers are real load bearing members. that needs to go to a footing or beam. in most cases they don't hold much weight.
Trimmers are what support the beam yes. Am I wrong?
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