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Old 03-21-2013, 08:02 PM   #1
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Load transfer


I was wondering when you have a load bearing wall that load must be transferred directly under that wall all the way to the foundation correct? Also, when you remove a load bearing wall and add a beam I know there are trimmers supporting but do you ever need a support in the middle of the beam? And if you do how would you transfer that all the way to the foundation? Just curious how that works.

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Old 03-21-2013, 08:39 PM   #2
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Load transfer


This topic has been discussed many times on this forum, I suggest you do a thread search. There are a number of posts that discuss various aspects of your question.

"load must be transferred directly under that wall all the way to the foundation correct?" This is incorrect. The load may be transferred to a main beam if the beam is capable of handling the load. This is commonly seen if there is an adequate beam in the basement, for example.

"do you ever need a support in the middle of the beam". Generally the beam is designed so it does not need a support in the middle.

"And if you do how would you transfer that all the way to the foundation?" The load may be transferred to a main beam as I discussed above. The main beam of course is supported by the foundation. All vertical loads from your house eventually get transferred to the foundation, but in most cases the load path is not directly from the load to the foundation.

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Old 03-22-2013, 08:01 AM   #3
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Load transfer


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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
This topic has been discussed many times on this forum, I suggest you do a thread search. There are a number of posts that discuss various aspects of your question.

"load must be transferred directly under that wall all the way to the foundation correct?" This is incorrect. The load may be transferred to a main beam if the beam is capable of handling the load. This is commonly seen if there is an adequate beam in the basement, for example.

"do you ever need a support in the middle of the beam". Generally the beam is designed so it does not need a support in the middle.

"And if you do how would you transfer that all the way to the foundation?" The load may be transferred to a main beam as I discussed above. The main beam of course is supported by the foundation. All vertical loads from your house eventually get transferred to the foundation, but in most cases the load path is not directly from the load to the foundation.
So, lets say I wanted to remove a load bearing wall and replace it with a beam. The trimmer supports for that beam need to rest on the beam that is in the basement or do they need to just rest on the floor right above the beam? Mine is a metal I beam.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:03 AM   #4
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Load transfer


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Originally Posted by miguel24932 View Post
So, lets say I wanted to remove a load bearing wall and replace it with a beam. The trimmer supports for that beam need to rest on the beam that is in the basement or do they need to just rest on the floor right above the beam? Mine is a metal I beam.

studs go in a wall that is formed from two wall plates, top and bottom. supports for beams are in the wall along with the beam in some cases in between the plates and load transference is created with solid support below said walls that go to a foundation that holds up the house.

if you post pics of the area in question you will get direct answers but no one here will be able to offer concrete (vitally important structural advice) advice even with pics.you will need an on site structural engineer to evaluate and offer needed concrete advice.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:45 AM   #5
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Load transfer


Somehow your load path needs to end up being resolved at a structural component of the foundation. Whether the jack studs are directly above a column or beam is irrelevant as long as the point load that is created by the jack studs is properly supported and transferred to another supporting member and then in turn to the foundation.

Pictures or sketches are the key here. There is a wealth of knowledge but like most people we navigate better when we can see where we are going.
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Old 03-22-2013, 12:17 PM   #6
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Load transfer


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Somehow your load path needs to end up being resolved at a structural component of the foundation. Whether the jack studs are directly above a column or beam is irrelevant as long as the point load that is created by the jack studs is properly supported and transferred to another supporting member and then in turn to the foundation.

Pictures or sketches are the key here. There is a wealth of knowledge but like most people we navigate better when we can see where we are going.
What do you mean by point load? It would just make sense that for the proper load transfer the jack studs would need to be directly above the beam or column. Otherwise wouldn't the jack studs need to brought down all the way to the basement and a footing poured? Also, just curious but for 2 story houses do the stairs and landing need support all the way down to the foundation?-
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Old 03-22-2013, 02:24 PM   #7
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Load transfer


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Originally Posted by miguel24932 View Post
What do you mean by point load? It would just make sense that for the proper load transfer the jack studs would need to be directly above the beam or column. Otherwise wouldn't the jack studs need to brought down all the way to the basement and a footing poured? Also, just curious but for 2 story houses do the stairs and landing need support all the way down to the foundation?-

a point load would be such as your jack stud resting on a beam. this would be a point load on the beam.

loads must be transferred from above to the foundation. Many ways to accomplish this, but must be determined by someone both knowledgeable and experienced at performing structural design.
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Old 03-22-2013, 03:55 PM   #8
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a point load would be such as your jack stud resting on a beam. this would be a point load on the beam.

loads must be transferred from above to the foundation. Many ways to accomplish this, but must be determined by someone both knowledgeable and experienced at performing structural design.
Is it normal to have a support jack stud resting on lets say a wood or metal I beam? If so, what is the proper way to fasten it to the beam? I know they make post to beam connectors and such but that its for like 4x4s or 6x6s.
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Old 03-22-2013, 04:05 PM   #9
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Load transfer


Usually your point load such as a jack stud would be resting on the floor. The load would then transfer directly down (assuming your jack stud is axially plum) thru the subfloor to what ever is below it. If you have floor joists then you must add additional blocking between the joists if the point load falls between the joists. If not you must make sure that the beam supporting the joists is also designed and capable of carrying and redistributing the additional point load that you are putting on it.

We can go thru engineering 101 all day long but it would be so much easier if you just ask a specific question about a specific situation.
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Old 03-22-2013, 05:40 PM   #10
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Usually your point load such as a jack stud would be resting on the floor. The load would then transfer directly down (assuming your jack stud is axially plum) thru the subfloor to what ever is below it. If you have floor joists then you must add additional blocking between the joists if the point load falls between the joists. If not you must make sure that the beam supporting the joists is also designed and capable of carrying and redistributing the additional point load that you are putting on it.

We can go thru engineering 101 all day long but it would be so much easier if you just ask a specific question about a specific situation.
So if the jack stud rests on the subfloor with a joist directly underneath than that is sufficient to support that load? I get confused because I thought it had to rest on an exterior wall because that wall sits on the foundation.
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Old 03-22-2013, 05:43 PM   #11
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So if the jack stud rests on the subfloor with a joist directly underneath than that is sufficient to support that load?
not necessarily ..... what ever is under the column (jack stud) must be sufficient to carry the load. A single floor joist may or may be sufficient to carry the load, it depends on many factors
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Old 03-22-2013, 05:45 PM   #12
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Load transfer


here's something you can review, maybe it will help .... http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publication...ers-and-beams/
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Old 03-22-2013, 06:03 PM   #13
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Load transfer


Are you trying to do something or just trying to understand framing concepts?
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Old 03-22-2013, 06:40 PM   #14
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Load transfer


[QUOTE=GBrackins;1143267]not necessarily ..... what ever is under the column (jack stud) must be sufficient to carry the load. A single floor joist may or may be sufficient to carry the load, it depends on many factors[/

realistically you would want a beam that is supporting the joist to be where the jack stud rests, correct?
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Old 03-22-2013, 06:42 PM   #15
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Are you trying to do something or just trying to understand framing concepts?
Just trying to understand more yes...Like another question for example...when you have a 2 story house you have stairs and landing leading to the 2nd floor. This creates a void in the below floor joists so you have to double up and add some header joists, correct? Do you have to support those stairs all the way to the foundation or are they not really structural?

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