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Old 03-02-2011, 03:23 PM   #1
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Load bearing walls


Please see pix - anyone have an idea if these walls are load bearing? I got some people telling me that nothing is needed and other saying use LVL's in the attic with hurricane stappes to the joist's right over where the old wall would be. I cant tell if there is a footer or not below the comers. I have not yet drilled down into the concrete to see if it's deeper than 4" (that's next i think) Home was built in 1976 so I'm pretty sure it not a post tension slab. The thing that worries me are the two corners - they are beefed up to 3 2x4's. BTW, San Diego so no snow.

Check it out:

http://inthebeginningtherewasahouse....m/pictures/166
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Load bearing walls-dsc03385.jpg   Load bearing walls-dsc03394.jpg   Load bearing walls-dsc03393-1-.jpg   Load bearing walls-walls.jpg  


Last edited by Brandon760; 03-02-2011 at 03:39 PM.
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Old 03-02-2011, 05:20 PM   #2
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Load bearing walls


Brandon, welcome!

First, I and most others will say, pay a consulting fee and have someone look at it. That said from your photo album, your home looks to be a typical ranch style, essentially a long rectangle. The picture in the atic shows engineered roof trusses. Engineered roof trusses are designed for large spans, and more than likely are only bearing on the outside walls. Your drawing indicates a 33ft depth for the house, which is within the span of 2x4 on 24 inch centers in a climate like San Diego (no snow load). So with a large rectangle and engineered roof trusses spanning 33 ft in San Diego, it is likely non of your interior walls are load bearing. The 3 2x4 thing is just a best practice method for joining perpendicular walls. Does not mean it is load bearing.

I am sure there will be others along with more experience than I.

Good luck with your project!

Daniel


Last edited by FixitDragon; 03-02-2011 at 05:26 PM.
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Old 03-02-2011, 05:44 PM   #3
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Load bearing walls


I agree with every thing that Daniel said.--Looks like full span trusses==non load bearing .

Still good to hear from an engineer.--Mike---
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:46 PM   #4
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Load bearing walls


Right on! Thanks for the quick reply! Seems like it's not load bearing. I think I am going to cut one of the corners with a low power saw and see the blade binds up from any pressure.


If any one is looking for a truss span chart here it is:

http://http://www.square1truss.com/r...s/RoofSpan.pdf

Looks like with my 3/12 roof I can go up to 43'!
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:59 PM   #5
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Load bearing walls


Keep us posted---be safe----use a sawsall if you have one--cut the nails between the stud and the bottom plate.--Mike---
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Old 03-02-2011, 08:34 PM   #6
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Load bearing walls


I would at least add some web chord lateral braces the length of the building, on both sides to bring it up to today's code for shear flow in a seismic zone. Add some better gable end truss braces, especially if removing any part of the walls tying the gables together for wind/earthquake resistance. A Structural Engineer may require plywood or other sheathing under the new drywall on each end of the wall sections at gable ends. If not, you would only have the ceiling drywall to resist any end push or movement from forces. The diagonal braces appear to be needed as well- at the gables- on the top of the bottom chords; http://www.sbcindustry.com/images/pu...i3mhbicma79ot2

Gary

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