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Old 09-14-2013, 08:16 PM   #1
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


I just opened up the wall here in the hopes of opening up our dining room to give it more light and the look of space.

Upon removing the dry wall, there are 2 x 6's, that create the wall structure, but i'm not sure if those are for support or just to match the width of the columns that may be the actual ceiling support.

How do I know if it's a load bearing wall and if it is, what do I do to fix it? (there is a bedroom and bathroom up there)

The goal is to open up the area in red. I obviously will have to move the plumbing and electrical as well.

Can I reroute the drain with 90 degree turns into the column and back down to the half wall? Will 90 degree elbows in a drain be ok and not cause clogging?

The first photo is the proposed plan with the cutout in red and the drain pipe in black. The second and third photo are closeups of the top where i'm not sure if it's a load bearing wall or not.
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Is this a load bearing wall?  If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?-1.jpg   Is this a load bearing wall?  If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?-photo-2.jpg   Is this a load bearing wall?  If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?-photo-3.jpg   Is this a load bearing wall?  If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?-2.jpg  


Last edited by noone; 09-14-2013 at 08:23 PM.
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Old 09-14-2013, 08:40 PM   #2
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Which way is your trussess running? But if your just taking taking that short wall out i would go for it.And its so close to the exterior wall wont make a difference anyway.

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Old 09-14-2013, 09:03 PM   #3
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Well, I can see trusses running perpendicular up there if I peek into that crack at the top.

How should I go about this?

It's only about a 6 foot span that will be unsupported.
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Old 09-14-2013, 09:27 PM   #4
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


When you cut out for the opening just put a header at the top to supporting it.If your trusses are running that way it is a load bearing wall.Iam no plumber but i do not see a problem with what you have in mind rerouting the stack.Looking at your drawing again that is a big bend on that pipe i dont think that will work probley be best to bring a plumber in for that.

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Old 09-14-2013, 09:55 PM   #5
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Do you mean like this in green? Should I do two boards like in green the picture, or is one good enough?

This could be tricky because of the pipes, but doable.
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Old 09-14-2013, 11:13 PM   #6
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Without seeing more of the layout of your home and what's up in the ceiling it's hard to be sure if it is a load bearing wall or not. More than likely it's not, normally a loadbearing wall would be much longer and run most of the way across your home. As mentioned earlier putting up a header would be a good idea in any case. A header is made up of 2 pieces of 2x lumber with a piece of half-inch plywood between them to make the thickness the same as the studs in the wall. Since your wall is 2x6 you need to make up 5.5" with the header thickness. For this span you could probably get away using 2x6's for it. You will need a double stud on each end of it for support.
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Old 09-14-2013, 11:57 PM   #7
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


How can I put a header up there when I have to move that drain as shown?

It doesn't look like I have any room.
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Old 09-15-2013, 01:27 AM   #8
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


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How can I put a header up there when I have to move that drain as shown?

It doesn't look like I have any room.
You might have to make your window smaller so you have somewhere to run the pipe and have room to put your header.
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Old 09-15-2013, 08:02 AM   #9
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Given that you have floor joists overhead rather than trusses I would treat it as a load bearing wall. Rather than relocating all the plumbing and wiring I would be inclined to frame up tall 12" opens evenly spaced across the wall. Support would still be there and no plumbing or wiring would need relocated. You could put a ledger on the bottems and put some decorative bottles there like at the Olive Garden.
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Old 09-17-2013, 06:11 PM   #10
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Ok, here is a video of what i've got up there. Very intriguing because I didn't know that trusses could be made of OSB......

http://youtu.be/zUWqfYdh1Qk


On the bright side, it looks like that drain comes down from the ceiling on the right side so if I open up the ceiling I can probably route it straight down, but now I have to remove more drywall........

So I I can get by with a 4 x 6 header, I may be good here.

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Old 09-17-2013, 06:36 PM   #11
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


those are I-joists not trusses. I-joists are an engineered framing member.

it does appear the wall in question is load bearing as the i-joist bear upon that wall.
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Old 09-17-2013, 06:40 PM   #12
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Those are not trusses, they're I-joists. It's hard to say from video if those are bearing on the wall.
Edit: Gary beat me to it.
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Old 09-17-2013, 10:21 PM   #13
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Like i said before even if it was a load bearing wall its close enough to that exteior wall i wouldn't worry about it.
Have you done anything else with this project?
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Old 09-17-2013, 10:50 PM   #14
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


No I haven't done anything else yet.

I wish there was a way to tell if its putting any weight on that wall. This is really bugging me.

On one hand, I want to just reroute that drain and be done. The other hand says to open up the ceiling and bring the drain straight down to the right and then completely reconstruct that wall to include a header.
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Old 09-17-2013, 11:21 PM   #15
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Is this a load bearing wall? If so, what do I do to support the ceiling?


Quote:
Originally Posted by scottktmrider View Post
Like i said before even if it was a load bearing wall its close enough to that exteior wall i wouldn't worry about it.
Have you done anything else with this project?
Considering those beams run parallel to the wall the distance to the wall doesn't mean anything as far as support. If they were running perpendicular to the wall it would make a difference but since they are parallel even 2 feet away from the wall is the same as 40 feet away from the wall as far as support goes.

That being said, it doesn't look like those beams are spliced on top of the wall, the only pass over it. This means it's fairly likely that the wall is not loadbearing.

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