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Old 01-23-2017, 12:27 PM   #1
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Load Bearing Wall?


Hello,

New member to the forum but have been reading posts on here for quite a while. We are in the midst of remodeling our kitchen. We have a partition wall between the living room and kitchen. The ceiling is a Cathedral ceiling with a ridge beam. I am trying to figure out if this wall is load bearing or of any real structural value as we want to open up the two rooms. The wall is 2x3 construction with 3/8 plywood on both side. I also noticed on the kitchen side at the top there appears to be flashing. Can someone give there opinion or thoughts on this. There is a basement with a beam under the floor. That beams lines up with the ridge beam and this wall is not sitting on that basement beam. I am including photos to give you better idea. Thanks in advance.
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Old 01-23-2017, 12:36 PM   #2
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


The topic of load bearing walls has been discussed dozens, maybe hundreds of times on this forum over the past decade. In all cases, the question can only be answered by carefully checking to see what, if anything, the wall is supporting. This can best be done by visual examination of the framing above the wall. Typical structural elements that may be supported by the wall include joists, beams, walls, or diagonal bracing (typically in the attic). Rarely trusses may bear on the wall. If you are not comfortable performing the inspection, you need to hire a professional, who could be an engineer, architect, contractor, or framer, to do the inspection for you. If there is no access above, it would likely be necessary to remove part of the ceiling to perform a visual inspection.

Never assume that a wall is non-load bearing based on plans (the house may not be built to plan), similar looking houses in the neighborhood (your framing may be different), internet opinions from individuals who have not examined your framing, or individuals who have not performed a visual examination in person.
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Old 01-23-2017, 12:45 PM   #3
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


Thank you for the reply. The more I have been inspecting the wall the more I feel it isn't load bearing. That being said, what is throwing me is both sides being plywood sheeted. I know it is not uncommon to sheet the wall first like that in some cases and I get the kitchen side because blocking it with plywood is great for hanging the cabinets. Since there is no attic access I can readily see or easy see what it is attached to or potentially holding up.
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Old 01-23-2017, 01:00 PM   #4
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


Your gonna have a hole to patch if you remove the wall anyway, so why not just remove a small section of the ceiling and see whats up?
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Old 01-23-2017, 03:38 PM   #5
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


The picture is throwing me off... does the ceiling transition from the slope to flat right near that wall you want to remove? If not, what is carrying the load from the roof rafters on that side of the room?
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Old 01-23-2017, 03:47 PM   #6
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I agree it does look weird but it does slope past it to the outside wall. I assume at this point the ridge beam is carrying the load.
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Old 01-23-2017, 03:48 PM   #7
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Different pic to show slope better.
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Old 01-23-2017, 05:45 PM   #8
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


highly unlikely to be load bearing then.. looks like its just there to hang cabinets.. But as others suggested open things up and take a look... better safe then have your roof cave in..
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Old 01-23-2017, 08:03 PM   #9
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


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You are going to need to remove ceiling drywall from both sides of wall, to remove rafter toe-nails down into top plate anyway... pointed end of cats-paw rather than saws-all- unless metal blade slowly, even then--- may nail pop close by. Maybe the metal flashing is to screw the ceiling drywall to- between rafters, done that before. The plywood is to hold the end studs square/straight and keep the wall from racking laterally.

Can't use any 2x3 studs for bearing walls... non-bearing up to 10' high are fine; Table 602.3(5), check locally. http://www2.iccsafe.org/states/newje...s_chapter6.pdf

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Old 01-23-2017, 08:10 PM   #10
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


No way it is load bearing. The rafters would have to have a splice there for it to be. And then why not the rest of the rafters.
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Old 01-23-2017, 08:50 PM   #11
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@RRH...good point. Once I get the wall down I will check all of those above the wall. From what I can see, I didn't see a splice or any sister joints.
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Old 01-23-2017, 08:54 PM   #12
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@Gary in WA..good point as well. Using the flashing as strapping for the drywall makes a lot of sense. Also thanks for the advice!
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Old 01-24-2017, 02:22 PM   #13
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


You're welcome. The finished kitchen floor will be hard to match... think about leaving the wall existing, but only as tall as the lower cabinet- for a backsplash with a finish cap on it with an outlet on each side, You would get the open-ness but not lose all the storage space. A nice dividing line between the two floors- if different, or do you have other plans?

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Old 01-24-2017, 06:01 PM   #14
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@Gary...actually the plan is to leave the bottom part of the wall and cabs. The bottom cabs only go halfway over as there is a large opening for chairs or something. The uppers will fit perfectly with a kickplate in that void and are being refinished with shellac and CC. New floor going in so no worries there. Thanks for the thoughts!
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Old 01-24-2017, 07:51 PM   #15
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Re: Load Bearing Wall?


Might also be a good time to rid yourself of that popcorn ceiling.
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