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Old 01-12-2012, 08:36 PM   #1
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Load Bearing Wall


If a wall was a load bearing wall would it not run across the whole house? I am looking to take a wall down that sits below a beam. Above the beam are two bedrooms and the walls are no where near the beam. The wall that I would like to take down is dividing the living room from a bedroom. Any suggestions?
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:42 PM   #2
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Load Bearing Wall


Not necessarily. Depends.
Draw a picture for us.
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:55 PM   #3
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Load Bearing Wall


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Originally Posted by renogirl1 View Post
If a wall was a load bearing wall would it not run across the whole house?
In principle... yes. But it can be built to carry that load in other ways too.
For example the header over a door or opening.

Quote:
Above the beam are two bedrooms and the walls are no where near the beam.
Above the beam... is another world

Quote:
I am looking to take a wall down that sits below a beam.
The wall that I would like to take down is dividing the living room from a bedroom. Any suggestions?
Be careful.
Be prepared to ADD a header or such to any long span...
and for the possibility that some portion of the wall (or a new post)
will still be needed to carry the load.

And also consider what mechanical's are in that wall...
HVAC duct? water pipes? drain pipes? electrical?

hth

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Old 01-12-2012, 09:54 PM   #4
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Load Bearing Wall


How are you sure the wall carries anything if it sits below the beam? It could be only a partition wall. It would be advisable to get an engineer to look at the situation and determine if the beam can take the load by itself. If the wall IS load bearing and you remove it, then what is going to take the load that it used to? If only the beam will, then you better make sure that what holds the beam up, from below grade up to the beam, was designed to do that.
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Old 01-12-2012, 09:56 PM   #5
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Load Bearing Wall


Best to get someone to look at it. There are a few ways to tell. I would hate to give you advice and have your house fall apart on you.
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Old 01-13-2012, 09:18 AM   #6
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Load Bearing Wall


This is a popular topic here.

If you don't know how to tell if a wall is load bearing, I don't think you are ready to move it (or take it down, whatever).

If you are going to attempt this project, consult an experienced archy or engineer first. They will be able to tell you how to properly complete the task.


Just my $0.02

Peace.
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Old 01-13-2012, 12:49 PM   #7
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Load Bearing Wall


It is ABSOLUTELY incorrect to assume that a wall is non-load bearing simply because it does not span across an entire house. Many houses are built in stages, and the original wall could be load bearing, but was not extended to the addition, which could have been framed 90 degrees off the original. Not uncommon. It is also dangerous to assume that a beam supported by a wall does not require the wall for support. This assumes that the beam was properly sized to span the gap without need of intermediate support.

The only way to tell if a wall is load bearing is to draw an accurate diagram of the framing to determine the load path from the roof to the foundation, to see if any of the load goes through the wall. This is not as simple as it sounds, if you have any doubts about your ability to undertake this, seek professional assistance before you touch the wall.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:43 PM   #8
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Load Bearing Wall


Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
It is ABSOLUTELY incorrect to assume that a wall is non-load bearing simply because it does not span across an entire house. Many houses are built in stages, and the original wall could be load bearing, but was not extended to the addition, which could have been framed 90 degrees off the original. Not uncommon. It is also dangerous to assume that a beam supported by a wall does not require the wall for support. This assumes that the beam was properly sized to span the gap without need of intermediate support.

The only way to tell if a wall is load bearing is to draw an accurate diagram of the framing to determine the load path from the roof to the foundation, to see if any of the load goes through the wall. This is not as simple as it sounds, if you have any doubts about your ability to undertake this, seek professional assistance before you touch the wall.
As much as I hate to agree with an engineer, Holzman is right here.
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Old 01-13-2012, 06:59 PM   #9
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Load Bearing Wall


daniel is right, in some homes the framing can be pretty involved, with all kinds of bearing points, beams and sections of floor joists that change direction. some of the places that i have framed make experience framers scratch their head.. some of these have bearing walls that range from 2' long all the way up to 30' ft long . it depends on what the architect dreamed up when designing the place
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