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Old 10-20-2005, 07:03 PM   #1
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Load Bearing Wall


The yellow/orange picture is NOT my home it was another exact model down the street that was for sale at the same time. As you can see in this picture, they removed a wall.. I believe this wall may be load bearing as there are 2x6's floor joists running perpendicular to this wall above.. Although there are no walls above this wall on the second story. Im not sure how long the wall is right now but id say its 8-10' The opening would span the right side of existing door jam to the left wall.

what size and timber type do I need for a new support beam? Looking at that yellow/orange picture it looks like it may be a 4x12??? Also, what should I use for the new studs that would support this new beam? Would it be 2 2x4's? Do I extend these new studs all the way to the floor or do they stop at the 2x4 running parallel to the floor?

Also, I know that im suppose to make a alternate supporting wall while Im tearing apart this wall






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Old 10-20-2005, 09:11 PM   #2
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Load Bearing Wall


Quote:
what size and timber type do I need for a new support beam? Looking at that yellow/orange picture it looks like it may be a 4x12???
You would have to ask the local AHJ about spanning, but I would think 4 x 12 (I assume you mean 2, 2x12's) would be enough, but again...ask the building dept. in your area.

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Also, what should I use for the new studs that would support this new beam? Would it be 2 2x4's?
2 2x4 king studs should do but again...well same rules as before.....don't take my word for it.

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Do I extend these new studs all the way to the floor or do they stop at the 2x4 running parallel to the floor?
Support everything from the ground. Meaning, any bearing wall should have a direct "path" to the foundation. Don't rely on a wall more than a couple feet away to hold up the next bearing wall (or roof, or whatever's up there)

EDIT: BTW, don't forget the extra plywood sandwiched between the 2 2x12's or the width will be off.

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Old 10-29-2005, 07:43 AM   #3
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Load Bearing Wall


This is a span Calculator:

http://www.cwc.ca/design/tools/calcs...2/contents.php

These are beam and header tables:

http://www.umass.edu/bmatwt/publicat...and_beams.html

Either one will help you just fine. My 12yr. old can use these, and I look at his results to apply the "reasonable man test", to make sure he didn't make a math error.
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