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Old 03-05-2009, 01:43 PM   #1
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Living room extension - concrete pad question


I have a 2 story house which is basically square. Where the living room is, there is an "inward notch", where the second floor passes over what was supposed to be a small patio, I guess. It measures 14'x3'. I would like to flush out the lower level wall and reclaim this space for the living room. Do I need to remove the patio slab and pour a new one, can I get by with just a grade beam of some sort, or can I pour over this patio slab to increase thickness and strength? House is slab on grade. Will try to attach photo of area. What is the best way to fill in this space, from a flooring standpoint. This area, and the existing living room floor do not need to line up, as I may make this area a large, elevated window seat type space. Thanks.
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Old 03-05-2009, 04:26 PM   #2
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Living room extension - concrete pad question


The edge of a slab on grade still is over a foundation down to the frost line. So this patio needs to be removed, and a proper foundation and slab can be built. After getting a permit of course.

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Old 03-06-2009, 12:43 PM   #3
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Living room extension - concrete pad question


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The edge of a slab on grade still is over a foundation down to the frost line. So this patio needs to be removed, and a proper foundation and slab can be built. After getting a permit of course.
The previous owner told me he had to dig down about 10-12" to snake a pipe from the well under the slab and up into the room where the well pump is, which leads me to believe there is only a thickened edge, and not a foundation downbelow frostline. I will dig when the soil is thawed, to ascertain existing condition.

Next question is, assuming a new slab in the now new interior area, would I need to worry about moisture seeping up into the joint, into my living room? I assume some sort of exansive material gets put between existing slab and new, so how do I guard against water seepage? Thanks in advance!
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Old 03-06-2009, 12:47 PM   #4
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Living room extension - concrete pad question


Where are you located?

A thickened/downturned slab 12" deep would only be acceptable in the very warmest parts of the country (maybe south Texas or Florida for instance). Most of the rest of the country will require a frost-depth footing, depth varying by location.

You'll of course still need a header over the door that is there now.
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Old 03-06-2009, 12:48 PM   #5
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Living room extension - concrete pad question


That's going to cost a lot of money just to gain 42 square feet!!!!!
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Old 03-06-2009, 12:54 PM   #6
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Living room extension - concrete pad question


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That's going to cost a lot of money just to gain 42 square feet!!!!!
That's why I am asking the questions! ;-)

Other idea might be post-supported raised floor area, like a huge window seat. Maybe four posts, a beam to carry joists and insulation, and then a kneewall up from existing edge of salb to carry a ledger beam and joist ends? Existing header at door opening to remain. Any comments on the workability of that?
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Old 03-06-2009, 12:55 PM   #7
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Living room extension - concrete pad question


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Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Where are you located?

A thickened/downturned slab 12" deep would only be acceptable in the very warmest parts of the country (maybe south Texas or Florida for instance). Most of the rest of the country will require a frost-depth footing, depth varying by location.

You'll of course still need a header over the door that is there now.
I am in CT, and I can't vouch for the competency of the guy who built this house in the 50's! I know his framing left something to be desired when I had a wall apart last year.
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Old 03-06-2009, 12:57 PM   #8
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Living room extension - concrete pad question


Still need a foundation for that plan

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