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Old 02-05-2012, 10:41 PM   #16
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lifting logs


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That wasn't very nice..
Alaska is not nice either.

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How do you know she's old? You can be a grandma at 30 years old.
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Hi folks,
Old grandma, up here in Alaska..

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Old 02-05-2012, 10:46 PM   #17
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Sorry. Didn't see that.
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Old 02-05-2012, 11:49 PM   #18
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lifting logs


Hi Grandma,

I built two log cabins; the last one was a 12'x16' in the Alaskan interior back in 1969.

But, I don't know as I can be of much help. The best I remember I got the logs up by sheer brute strength ( I was much younger then ).

If I were doing it again at my age out in the boonies, I would probably parbuckle them using a hand winch, come-a-long, or rope/pulley set.

Parbuckling was used for many, many years to load huge logs onto trucks.

I'll try to briefly describe how to do that.

You would use two long poles (somewhat longer than the highest height you need to go with the logs) and attach them near each end of the top log of whichever wall your working on. (just flatten the ends a little and nail onto the top log)

Then you take a rope and fasten each end to the top log (one end near one pole and the other end near the other pole. Make sure the rope is long enough that the middle will stretch out past where the other end of the poles rests on the ground.

Then take another rope and attach one end to the middle of the first rope.
The second rope should be long enough so that the other end will go across the entire top of the cabin.

Then roll the log you want to lift into place over the rope all the way to where the poles rest on the ground.

Throw the loose end of the second rope across the cabin and attach it to a hand winch.
Attach the hand winch to a tree, (via another rope if necessary, or if no trees, to something driven firmly into the ground).

As you crank the winch, the rope just smoothly rolls the log up the poles.

If the cable on the winch isn't long enough (or if you're using a come-a-long, you will have to wedge the log however high you get it on the poles til you can take another 'bite'.

Of course, if you have a vehicle, an ATV, or even a dog team, you could use that instead of a winch or come-a-long, and it would go much faster.

This is probably clear as mud, but it will work without straining yourself.

Best of luck,
Arky
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:00 AM   #19
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The axle would be the fulcrum, and the pole would be the lever. That setup would not get you very far, Grandma.

Why don't you ask for help? At your age you can get a hernia just by farting, and you don't want to be out in the woods by yourself unable to stand up, unless you have a death wish.
Heey!
How do you know how old I am???
Hmmm?

Just because I'm a grandma don't mean I'm old.................

I pack my own moose quarters, caribou quarters, and 2 years ago when I got a bison cow, I packed it out too.

Did take about 6 trips though, but by-golly I did it!
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:05 AM   #20
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Well. I was misled. I thought people on here were chomping at the bits to share their knowledge and their expertize to help others.
Over 100 people have looked at my post and not person on this construction forum has been able to answer my questions.
Oh well.
I am humbled.
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:12 AM   #21
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So, they way it's stacking up, my home-made fulcrum/axel/idea isn't gonna work too well.
Looks like I'll be forced to go with the spikes, come a-longs, and block and tackle.
I guess I can use my Jeep pick up to drag them up to the foundation.
And my 4-wheeler.

Then do the lift one end, then the other, few inches at a time.

Hopefully I wont be farting too much like that one fella said.
But, since they won't be anybody around but me guess it'll have to do. Reckon?
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:19 AM   #22
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Alaska is not nice either.
Well, I can't really blame him for that because I did say 'old' after all.

Darn, I hate getting busted.
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:27 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by abracaboom View Post
The axle would be the fulcrum, and the pole would be the lever. That setup would not get you very far, Grandma.

Why don't you ask for help? At your age you can get a hernia just by farting, and you don't want to be out in the woods by yourself unable to stand up, unless you have a death wish.
quote: The axle would be the fulcrum..
I knew that. I really did. My fingers got ahead of my brain on that one.

years ago, when I was a little over 'younger than I am now', I helped someone work on his house and he built a contraption just like the one I asked about you folks helping me build.

anyway, we lifted I-beams and T-beams with the one he made, really easy, but I can't remember how he made it exactly.

I probably need to just have me a jim-pole set up in the back of my truck, but I don't know how to do that either, so that'd be another topic.

But the block and tackle and ropes and 4-wheeler will probably suffice.
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:29 AM   #24
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Yeah. You're right. That did sound a little tacky. sorry.
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:32 AM   #25
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You didn't even gives us 2 hours to read your post. People don't live on this site. Some of them only check in once a day. With that attitude I wouldn't be surprised if no one responds now.
Yeah. You're right. That did sound a little tacky. sorry....
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:37 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by grasswidow
So, they way it's stacking up, my home-made fulcrum/axel/idea isn't gonna work too well.
Looks like I'll be forced to go with the spikes, come a-longs, and block and tackle.
I guess I can use my Jeep pick up to drag them up to the foundation.
And my 4-wheeler.

Then do the lift one end, then the other, few inches at a time.

Hopefully I wont be farting too much like that one fella said.
But, since they won't be anybody around but me guess it'll have to do. Reckon?
Can't you get some help? You sound tough enough, but two more hands and a good back could make this job...more plausible, should I say?
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Old 02-06-2012, 07:40 AM   #27
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lifting logs


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But the block and tackle and ropes and 4-wheeler will probably suffice.
Your block and tackle will work fine. I’m in the middle of building a 15x28 cabin with a loft with 7-8” logs. 7” is kind of small, I’d prefer 9-10” but in this case I’ve got to work with what I got.

For the first few courses I had a beam strapped to the rack of my truck with the block attached to it using a 4 wheeler to drag the logs around. After that I set up a pole to carry the block on one of the 15’walls. This worked good because all of my stock is about 17’ long. Load a 17’ log on the 15’ wall and simply roll the log into position and do the notching, planing etc. right next to it’s final resting place (we’re peeling on the ground though). I have progressive scaffolding going up on the inside so all of my notching is being done at a workbench level.

If you work smart little if any “brute force” is needed when working with logs.

BTW, this cabin is being built by a 52 year old grandma. I’m simply her helper with the tools. She’s peeled most of the logs herself and when she’s caught up on the peeling she’s on the other end of the log working on a notch.
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Old 02-06-2012, 10:46 AM   #28
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Things would be a whole lot easier if you had just one other person to help you. A little scaffolding would also be helpful.

Unlike previous posters, I have actually built a log home - my wife and I did it by ourselves a couple of years ago. The logs are 6x12 inches and were mostly random lengths around 13 or 14 feet. The house is single story with a loft; there are nine courses of logs. She and I just picked them up, carried them where they needed to be, and lifted them into place. For the top two courses, we first lifted them onto a short scaffold, climbed up, then lifted them the rest of the way.

Not saying it isn't a lot of physical work, but we are both in our 60s and got it done.
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Old 02-06-2012, 03:36 PM   #29
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Can't you get some help? You sound tough enough, but two more hands and a good back could make this job...more plausible, should I say?
Not this year. My boys moved outside (the lower 48 states) because their wives don't like the cold weather.

I need new beneficiaries for my will now. Ain't leaving nothing to nobody who don't want to live on it.
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Old 02-06-2012, 03:42 PM   #30
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Your block and tackle will work fine. I’m in the middle of building a 15x28 cabin with a loft with 7-8” logs. 7” is kind of small, I’d prefer 9-10” but in this case I’ve got to work with what I got.

For the first few courses I had a beam strapped to the rack of my truck with the block attached to it using a 4 wheeler to drag the logs around. After that I set up a pole to carry the block on one of the 15’walls. This worked good because all of my stock is about 17’ long. Load a 17’ log on the 15’ wall and simply roll the log into position and do the notching, planing etc. right next to it’s final resting place (we’re peeling on the ground though). I have progressive scaffolding going up on the inside so all of my notching is being done at a workbench level.

If you work smart little if any “brute force” is needed when working with logs.

BTW, this cabin is being built by a 52 year old grandma. I’m simply her helper with the tools. She’s peeled most of the logs herself and when she’s caught up on the peeling she’s on the other end of the log working on a notch.
I know how to work smart, and I've done more than my fair share of hard work, let me say. But, I have never built a log cabin before.

That is awesome and a good inspiration. I was thinking last night I should buy a good camera and video recorder and make a diary as I go along.
Then if I run into problems you guys can see exactly what I need to do.

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