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chefjames333 09-19-2008 02:33 AM

laying subfloor
 
I receintly purchased a new (used) home. The original owner enclosed the porch. It now has a room with a concrete floor. I want to put ceramic tile that he supplied but the floor is not level. I would just as well have it a couple of inches higher anyway since the main house is higher. My question is attaching the subfloor to the concrete. I do not have an airnailer or a compressor to power one. How else can I attach the subfloor? Can I use screws with a hammer drill? How horrible is doing that? Any suggestion appreciated. Do the do it yourself home stores rent airnailers?

James

ClnlBrahm 09-19-2008 03:09 AM

DEFINITELY don't take my word for it, but when we laid our sub-floor, we bought a powder-actuated nail gun for less than $70 at either lowes or somewhere like it. You have to buy the powder and nails, but they are relatively cheap. Now wait for someone who knows what they're talking about :whistling2:

buletbob 09-19-2008 06:17 AM

I can't understand why you would need an air nailer to install a subfloor over concrete. unless your going to frame a floor structure over it. I only know of one nailer that will shot into the concrete

If your just installing plywood to the concrete then you will need a hammer drill with a 1/4" hammer drill bit. When I install hardwood flooring over concrete I install a 6 mil poly over the concrete and then lay the 3/4 cdx plywood over, I then drill and fasten the sheets with this fastener every 16" square.http://www.concretefasteners.com/ima...ive-anchor.gifIts called a split drive anchor. the nice thing about these fasteners are that you will need a crow bar to remove them, they have great holding power. plus they will be flush with the surface when finished. 1-1/2" would be fine if you decide to use them.
I hope this was of some help to you. BOB

ClnlBrahm 09-19-2008 06:47 AM

I only know of one nailer that will shot into the concrete

We successfully used that powder actuated gun to fasten furring strips directly into the the concrete <-- is this something generally not practiced?

chefjames333 09-19-2008 07:48 AM

Building a new subfloor to make floor level
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chefjames333 (Post 159351)
I receintly purchased a new (used) home. The original owner enclosed the porch. It now has a room with a concrete floor. I want to put ceramic tile that he supplied but the floor is not level. I would just as well have it a couple of inches higher anyway since the main house is higher. My question is attaching the subfloor to the concrete. I do not have an airnailer or a compressor to power one. How else can I attach the subfloor? Can I use screws with a hammer drill? How horrible is doing that? Any suggestion appreciated. Do the do it yourself home stores rent airnailers?

James

I appologise for not being clear. The floor is sloped so I need to frame out a new floor that is level so I can put the ceramic tile down on the new floor. I am going to frame it and put plywood over it. I am trying to figure a way to attach the new built floor to the concrete. Can I just secure it to the existing walls? Would that be enough?

chefjames333 09-19-2008 07:52 AM

I am framing a subfloor
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by buletbob (Post 159361)
I can't understand why you would need an air nailer to install a subfloor over concrete. unless your going to frame a floor structure over it. I only know of one nailer that will shot into the concrete

If your just installing plywood to the concrete then you will need a hammer drill with a 1/4" hammer drill bit. When I install hardwood flooring over concrete I install a 6 mil poly over the concrete and then lay the 3/4 cdx plywood over, I then drill and fasten the sheets with this fastener every 16" square.http://www.concretefasteners.com/ima...ive-anchor.gifIts called a split drive anchor. the nice thing about these fasteners are that you will need a crow bar to remove them, they have great holding power. plus they will be flush with the surface when finished. 1-1/2" would be fine if you decide to use them.
I hope this was of some help to you. BOB

Thanks for the help Bob, I am framing a new floor to put over the concrete. It is sloped from it being a porch due to drainage. I think the easiest way to correct would be just build a new floor over the concrete that is level. Any more suggestions greatly appreciated.

buletbob 09-19-2008 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chefjames333 (Post 159390)
Thanks for the help Bob, I am framing a new floor to put over the concrete. It is sloped from it being a porch due to drainage. I think the easiest way to correct would be just build a new floor over the concrete that is level. Any more suggestions greatly appreciated.


How much of a span is the new floor joist going to be? and what is the head room from the slab to the ceiling. And of coarse do you have the head room for the front door? A picture would help out a great deal, to see what your up against. BOB

chefjames333 09-20-2008 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buletbob (Post 159553)
How much of a span is the new floor joist going to be? and what is the head room from the slab to the ceiling. And of coarse do you have the head room for the front door? A picture would help out a great deal, to see what your up against. BOB

Hey Bob,
The door threshold currently sits 2" above the concrete floor. The rooms are 8x12, 8x12 and 8x10. Obviously there are three rooms :laughing: The addition goes almost the entire length of the mobile home. All the doorways have been built up to allow for the raised floor. I have 10 ft from concrete to ceiling so its not an issue either. I will try to go by there and get some photos if you need them. I am thinking of framing a floor out of 2x4s and them using plywood over that. Thanks for the help

Termite 09-20-2008 01:26 PM

You're essentially placing ACQ treated sleepers down on the concrete, and will be attaching the CDX T&G plywood over that.

Will the 2x4's be cut to the taper of the floor so they lay right on the concrete? I hope so, because otherwise there will be a perceivable bounce. You can use a drill to pre drill through the 2x4's and use tapcon screws or similar anchors to fasten the sleepers down. The floor sheathing should be glued with subfloor adhesive and screwed down.

Instead of tapcons, another option would be a powder actuated nailer called a Ramset. It would work, but I think tapcons will work better. The concrete nails may work loose over time and cause little squeaks.

buletbob 09-20-2008 02:27 PM

Yes could you post a few pictures, I was unawear that you were talking about a mobile home. plus a concrete floor that is picthed.
Thanks, BOB

jamiedolan 09-20-2008 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 159752)
use tapcon screws or similar anchors

My vote is for brand name tapcon screws. I recently used some of the much less expensive generic version of tapcons and I found them hard to work with. I thought they were much harder to drive for some reason (had to back out a number of them and start over, even when driving them with a powerful Milwaukee). I went back to the Tapcon brand and don't have any problems with them.

Jamie


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