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gatorade 01-22-2011 10:30 PM

Knocking wall between Kitchen and Living room
 
We are remodeling our kitchen and want to knock down the wall that seperates the kitchen from the living room. There's an arch that I don't want to get rid of so I was thinking of just opening the wall and we would have 2 entries but not sure if that would look well. I hope that I'm making sense:huh:...Only reason that I don't want to get rid of it is because I have another one on the main entrance which makes the layout look nice. I attached pics.

Please any suggestions....the wall against the stove is the one that I want to tear down.

The wall is not a supporting wall.

http://i384.photobucket.com/albums/o...jan2011149.jpg

gatorade 01-22-2011 10:31 PM

Here is the other pic. it wouldn't let me paste all of them on the first post.

http://i384.photobucket.com/albums/o...jan2011151.jpg

gatorade 01-22-2011 10:33 PM

This is other arch as you walk into the house. This one will stay the same which is the reason that I didn't want to tear down the second arch.

http://i384.photobucket.com/albums/o...jan2011152.jpg

kwikfishron 01-23-2011 07:38 PM

Hi Gatorade, I’m surprised no one has responded to your post.
First off you just can’t just knock out that wall. Unless your house is single story with a truss roof and the trusses are running from what appears to be from your entry door to the rear door then that wall is probably load bearing and just can not simply be removed. Are your ceiling joist running parallel or perpendicular to the wall? Either way you need a Pro to do an on site inspection to determine whether or not the wall is load bearing. Also any structural work you’re doing to your home more than likely requires a permit. You should have at least a Drafter or Architect look at what you want to do and develop a plan before you proceed.

gregzoll 01-23-2011 08:05 PM

What you need to do first is draw out a floor plan of the Kitchen and area that the wall divides. One reason is, you put another doorway in, what are you going to do with the Stove, or Cabinets that go to that wall. Also the other reason is, you need to do as mentioned above, find out if it is load bearing or not. I got lucky with my wall that I took down between my Kitchen & Dining, because the load is carried to the wall dividing the Living Room & Dining Room, and could drop the one with no problems. That of course only took two years of thinking, and talking to numerous sources (ie architect, engineer) who told us that the Rafters being that they are 2x6, and meet at the Living Room wall, it would cause no problems.

Now of course, if I took the wall down between my Living Room & Dining, I would have my roof sitting in the first floor if I did not go through the process of thinking it out. Taking down walls is not something that you can just wake up one morning, and go "Gee, I am going to knock down a wall today." In your case, since you are wanting to do a pass-through or doorway, you will have to pull the Gypsum off, and then have to put in a header, but not until you brace both sides if load bearing.

dtsman 01-23-2011 08:06 PM

You said it is a non supporting wall, so I assume that the ceiling joist run from left to right in the first photo which will make this a non load bearing wall. or ?

What I think would look best is a half wall / bar so you have to use the bircked entrance to enter/exit the room. A secondary opening may not balance the room very well.

Bo

Remember,
If the women don't find you handsome,
they should at least find you handy.
(Red Green)

gatorade 02-01-2011 03:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dtsman (Post 576516)
You said it is a non supporting wall, so I assume that the ceiling joist run from left to right in the first photo which will make this a non load bearing wall. or ?

What I think would look best is a half wall / bar so you have to use the bircked entrance to enter/exit the room. A secondary opening may not balance the room very well.

Bo

Remember,
If the women don't find you handsome,
they should at least find you handy.
(Red Green)

The ceiling joists run from left to right. The shape of my house is like an "I" shape it runs long not side to side. This wall doesn't even make any contact whatsoever with the ceiling joists.

The wall on the right(mirrored wall) is a supporting wall. The joists are perpendicular to this wall.

photomikey 02-02-2011 12:33 PM

If you leave the existing archway and knock out the rest of the wall, you will have "archway to nowhere" and it will look weird.

If you were able to span the remainder of that wall with countertop and just bottom cabinets (essentially what you have now, minus top cabinets and the wall), you'd have a little bar and an open floorplan, plus the archway wouldn't look weird.

Don't forget to find a place for your fridge and your stove, neither of which will be able to be on that wall when you're finished. This is to say nothing of the water line/s that are in that wall (feeding the fridge plus mystery lines that may run other places), the gas/electric feeding the stove, the electric feeding the outlets, the ductwork venting the stove, plus re-installing everything wherever you move the fridge and the stove.

If you wanted an aesthetic opinion, the brick archway screams "70's" and saving it will scream "kitchen remodel" and not "nice kitchen". At the very least, stucco over it. At best, take it out completely. Having two isn't better than having one, it's twice as ugly as having one.

gatorade 02-02-2011 05:59 PM

Ok so we got rid of the wall and here is the after picture (unfortunately on the picture the globe lamp is in the way). It's still not completely done. We ended up having a friend that works in drywall do it for us.

http://i384.photobucket.com/albums/o.../020211010.jpg

gregzoll 02-02-2011 07:56 PM

Looks really nicely done.


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