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Old 11-21-2006, 04:54 PM   #1
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Kitchen Dry Wall


I reacently heard that I should be using a different kind of dry wall in my kitchen and In my bathroom buy the sink and toilet. Some type that is more moisture resistant. Any thoughts on this?

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Old 11-21-2006, 05:18 PM   #2
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Kitchen Dry Wall


You are probably speaking of Greenboard. It is supposed to be more moisture resistant than regular drywall. I have not heard of it being used in the locations you are speaking of though. Usually found behind shower stalls or in shower areas. The rules keep changing on this so I am not sure what is recommended now.

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Old 11-21-2006, 07:59 PM   #3
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Kitchen Dry Wall


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Originally Posted by jeepwillies View Post
I reacently heard that I should be using a different kind of dry wall in my kitchen and In my bathroom buy the sink and toilet. Some type that is more moisture resistant. Any thoughts on this?
You are talking about what is called 'moisture resistant' sheetrock.
It is NOT water resistant. It is most commonly called 'green board' because of it's green paper coating. It is also called 'MR' board.

This board is actually 'moisture vapor' resistant.
There is a product out now with a 'purple' paper face, made by "National Gypsum", that is rated as 'Moisture and mold resistant'.
Again, not water resistant.

The areas that you speak of are still commonly covered with normal sheetrock. Once you get a good coat of primer and paint on normal sheetrock, it is fine.
If you have backsplashes on your counter top, then heavy amounts of water shouldn't be getting onto the walls at that point.

I would be more concerned with the walls directly connected to your bathtub and shower.

you can install it anywhere you want...if it gives you peace of mind.

To any degree, you could use all MR board through out the bathroom, just be aware of the manufacturer's installation instructions for it. I believe that they call for attachement at every 10"-12" when installed on a ceiling.

This is what it is ......and everyone has their opinions as to it's practicality and usefullness.
It' your call....
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