Jackstuds Needed To Support A Header - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-06-2011, 03:07 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Jackstuds needed to support a header


I am cutting an opening in a concrete foundation wall for an egress window. The current window is a single pane metal frame window. The opening will be cut to 34 inches wide. I will put in a double 2x6 header and the opening will be framed with 2x10 PT lumber. The foundation is 10 inches thick. When I look in the IRC Table R502.5 that describes header spans for this house that has a center load bearing wall, only a one-story and is 32 feet wide, state requires using the snow load of 30 psf. The table goes from one jackstud (wall width 28 ft) to two being required (wall width 36ft). I am trying to interpolate between the numbers in the table but the basic question I have is one 2x10 jackstud ok to support the double 2x6 header across a 34 inch opening for this wall length of 32 ft?
Thanks

Advertisement

Jerry3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 09:22 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 183
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Jackstuds needed to support a header


I am assuming since this is poured concrete wall that this is a basement wall with wood framing above. I believe the straight forward answer is double jack studs as the 2 X 10 although it will have a bearing of about 9 1/2" is only tranferring the load down a portion that is equal to the depth of the header, e.g. 3". I always cut up to the top of the foundation wall and although a bit of a pain, I removed the siding and sheathing, cut out the box beam (rim board) above the window, cut back the joists, doubled or triped the box beam and supported the joists on joist hangers (leaving the sill plate in place), that way the window opening frame of treated lumber was pinned to the concrete and just functioned to hold the window in place and was non-structural. Obviously during this work you have to temporarily support the joists and any point loads above. Good Luck.

Advertisement

TheCamper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 12:02 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Jackstuds needed to support a header


Yes, the concrete foundation is poured with wood frame construction above. I am replacing an existing window in this 1942 house and only cutting concrete below the width of the window. I attached a couple of pictures of the existing window. I believe the top of the window is attached to the sill plate since the joists are just above that. I was finding it hard to believe that the simple metal frame of the existing window would require someting as strong as a double 2x6 header and two 2x10 jackstuds to replace it especially for only a 34 inch span. I was planning on having the concrete cut to the proper depth, framing the opening with the 2x10s and having the header directly under the sill plate. Using double jackstuds means I have to have the hole cut wider to make room. - thanks
Attached Images
   
Jerry3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 12:43 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 183
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Jackstuds needed to support a header


Typically you're only about 84" to 90" at best for ceiling height. When you are in the finished basement you want the window to look like it is placed as typical for habitable space; e.g. set the top of the rough opening at about 82", and for most codes based on the ICC Code for Openings For Emergency Escape and Rescue (egress), you need the actual opening (not the bottom of the window unit) no greater than 44" above the finished floor. This is where I would not do a typical header above the window but rather turn the rim board into a flush header as described in my other post. That way the window is up at a height that looks typical from the inside and the window well is less deep. As you likely know there are specific dimensional requirements for the window well when it is servicing the egress window. With ICC based codes once the bottom of the window well is greater than 44" below grade you need a permanent ladder afixed in the well. There are also specifications for the ladder. I hope this helps. Good Luck.
TheCamper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 12:58 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 183
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Jackstuds needed to support a header


The existing window frame is not taking a load and you are not changing the span, you need to nothing. When I framed new homes I always doubled the rim board above a basement hopper window so that the rim board acted as a "flush header", it transferred the above load onto the foundation to the right and left sides of the window and I hung the floor joists to the rim board with joist hangers so they were not being supported by just the sill plate and a few nails into the end grain. As your home was framed in 1942 the rim board is probably not doubled. Assuming you have a building permit and an Inspector will be looking this over he may or may not determine that additional framing needs to be done to support the load as it has performed for the last 68 years. You may want to have the inspector out for the framing inspection on the basement frame and rough plumbing and ask him about the window, then when he comes out for the insulation inspection he can pick up the window framing. I would double the rim board anyway and especially if there is a point load above, but I know I can be a bit over the top sometimes.
TheCamper is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to TheCamper For This Useful Post:
Jerry3 (03-06-2011)
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Widening entry door - temporary support benjamincall Building & Construction 2 12-10-2010 06:50 PM
Raising header above ceiling vanish Carpentry 7 12-05-2010 09:03 PM
sliding patio door header... sharp Remodeling 2 11-03-2009 04:50 PM
Building a header to support roof in NY jimmyfloyd Building & Construction 1 09-18-2009 06:58 PM
Replacing support beams Annimal76 Remodeling 1 09-10-2007 11:12 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts