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Old 04-09-2012, 10:52 PM   #1
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


We are putting an addition on our home in Missouri. The addition is on a cement slab. My husband built the interior walls and did not use pressure treated wood for sills or put a sill sealer underneath. Is this ok? The exterior walls have pt sills and sill sealer. If this is not ok, how do we fix it? Would a liquid sealer fix the problem if there is one?

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Old 04-09-2012, 11:02 PM   #2
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


Little late now to ask, not much you can do about it.
Should be fine.

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Last edited by joecaption; 04-09-2012 at 11:45 PM.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:24 PM   #3
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


Joe, she's talking about an interior wall
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:45 PM   #4
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


Got ya, I fixed it.
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Old 04-11-2012, 12:39 AM   #5
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


Since it's a new addition, including the slab, there should have been a vapor barrier poly plastic between the earth and concrete, as per minimum Code. Otherwise, any underground water could find its way to your new concrete through capillary action and wick into any wood touching it. That is the whole idea for the code-required poly (preventing extra moisture in the framing/living space. The sill sealer also acts as a thermal break from the warmed frame wall to cold concrete/earth = heat sink, robbing you of warmth already paid for.

If framed but not drywalled, add a poly or similar under the wall only if no v.b. was installed before concrete was poured.The inspector would have looked for that..... Some may say- "I checked for moisture by taping poly down on top the slab, none was present". In that 2' by 2' small area, in that particular season- not after a rain, etc.

Live and learn: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

The poly is important, Figs. 6-9: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...sture-problems
If poly was added, ignore this post...

Gary
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:54 AM   #6
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
Since it's a new addition, including the slab, there should have been a vapor barrier poly plastic between the earth and concrete, as per minimum Code. Otherwise, any underground water could find its way to your new concrete through capillary action and wick into any wood touching it. That is the whole idea for the code-required poly (preventing extra moisture in the framing/living space. The sill sealer also acts as a thermal break from the warmed frame wall to cold concrete/earth = heat sink, robbing you of warmth already paid for.

If framed but not drywalled, add a poly or similar under the wall only if no v.b. was installed before concrete was poured.The inspector would have looked for that..... Some may say- "I checked for moisture by taping poly down on top the slab, none was present". In that 2' by 2' small area, in that particular season- not after a rain, etc.

Live and learn: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

The poly is important, Figs. 6-9: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...sture-problems
If poly was added, ignore this post...

Gary
Not intending to hijack; but what do you do on an older home where you know this break is missing? (all beams sitting on foundation directly)
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Old 04-11-2012, 02:00 PM   #7
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


Quote:
Originally Posted by coderguy View Post
Not intending to hijack; but what do you do on an older home where you know this break is missing? (all beams sitting on foundation directly)
...and the bottom plate of an interior wall isn't PT (not sure what you mean by "beams" here)?

If the wall is finished (drywall is up), there's nothing simple you can do. Hope for the best. If it's not load-bearing, replacing it in the future is straight forward. If it's load bearing, not so much. The problem is there's no way to know for sure that it will be a problem. Maybe the slab will have minimal moisture and that plate won't rot for 20 years. Maybe the slab will have a lot of moisture and it'll turn into a big issue in two years. One thing you can do is remove the baseboards every couple of years and, assuming there's a gap below the sheetrock, check the plate for signs of mold/rot. No signs, no worries (for now). Of course, removing baseboards and properly reinstalling them may involve some work.
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:27 PM   #8
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


With your beams/joists sitting directly on the concrete wall, they are linked to any wetness from below. If the concrete is very dense, rather than very porous, capillary water wicking is reduced. There is no way to tell, other than checking on it periodically. Be certain the down-spouts are extended/directed away from the wall, and surface grading is such to prevent excessive water there. If they are not rotted by now, they should be fine, unless other things I mentioned change that.

have my joists shrunk ?

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Old 04-12-2012, 09:08 AM   #9
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Interior Wall Sills on Cement


This thread illustrates how building science is a constantly changing and improving field.

We have been building houses on concrete for how long now? And it's only recently that the vapor barrier was required?

My house was built in the 50's....earthquake country. It has lived this long....but the sismic steps I am having to do now vs 50 years ago....drastic difference. My neighbor (Lou 93 year old retired engineer) is astonished at how stout I'm building everything. But even he agrees that while what we did 50 years ago was 'good enough', nothing wrong with doing it better.

I do know that if the big one hits....my house will still be standing....b!itch is not going anywhere.

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