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Old 05-01-2012, 06:05 PM   #1
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


I have 2 bedrooms that are seperated by a interior wall. I've decided to remove half the wall so I can walk from one room into the other. I removed the sheet rock and exposed the stud framing. (yes, I have verified the wall is not load bearing).

I am only opening up half the wall. This exposes 5 studs total. Funny thing is that the stud that is in middle of this wall, is the only one that has this angled piece of wood at it's bottom end. The rest all meet up with your typical bottom flooring stud that runs across the concrete floor. It's possible that if I remove the sheet rock from the left side of this stud, I may find it has another angled piece on this side as well. (imagine an upside down Y )

I will attach a photo this as soon as I can.

I don't want to remove the studs until I know for sure what this angled piece is there for. I don't want to find out later, after removing it, that it is indeed some needed extra support for this wall to keep up.


Last edited by waitingtohear; 05-01-2012 at 06:08 PM.
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Old 05-01-2012, 08:26 PM   #2
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


lots of walls have angled pieces to help support the wall. to help you, a pic to look at will help tremendously.

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Old 05-01-2012, 11:20 PM   #3
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


It is quite possible that the angled piece is part of your shearwall for the house.
A shearwall will help keep the house from racking if lateral loads (wind) are applied to the Exterior perpendicular walls.

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Old 05-02-2012, 11:36 AM   #4
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


So it sounds like this is just a typical piece to help strengthen the wall frame overall.


Can a shearwall be an interior wall of the home to support an exterior wall?

The perpendicular wall to this bedroom wall would be the inside wall of our garage.

I guess if the garage doors were left open, the high winds could put pressure on the back wall of garage, which would then be getting help from the bedroom wall which is perpendicular to this garage wall, and happens to be almost dead center of it.
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Old 05-03-2012, 03:06 PM   #5
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


Here is a photo of it
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!-gedc0613.jpg  
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Old 05-03-2012, 04:14 PM   #6
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


If you remove the sheet rock to the left (as seen in the picture), you will see that diagonal brace continue up and to the left until it eventually hits your top plate. The diagonal brace isn't one continuous board but they are cut and installed between the studs in a way that looks like one continuous diagonal brace from the floor to the ceiling.

It will look like the last picture on this web page:

http://www.lamorindaweekly.com/archi...nda-Homes.html

I'm sure your next question will be "can I remove the brace and the wall?" No one here can know for certain if that wall is a critical shear wall for your home without seeing your home. However, I can tell you that the wood diagonal braces in old homes don't provide much in terms of shear strength. In fact, your drywall provides more shear strength than the diagonal brace. Read this report and decide for yourself if you want to remove the wall.

http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplrp/fplrp439.pdf

Last edited by loftezy; 05-03-2012 at 04:52 PM.
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Old 05-03-2012, 04:51 PM   #7
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


Quote:
Originally Posted by waitingtohear View Post
So it sounds like this is just a typical piece to help strengthen the wall frame overall.


Can a shearwall be an interior wall of the home to support an exterior wall?

The perpendicular wall to this bedroom wall would be the inside wall of our garage.

I guess if the garage doors were left open, the high winds could put pressure on the back wall of garage, which would then be getting help from the bedroom wall which is perpendicular to this garage wall, and happens to be almost dead center of it.
I agree with lofty and andy on what it is.

To answer your above question...yes, shear walls can be inside....I'm doing one now....in my case, it's a 2-story addition...the existing bedroom that got demo'd for the stairs now has the wall that the stairs are against that is a shear wall....1/2 OSB struct 1...with lots of nails....that one is only a B...the two walls in the addition are D's. I know...sounds greek....once you get into it...you understand. You should see some of my hold downs and anchors....

The good news is....if we get the 'big one', my house will be the only one on the block still standing....
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Old 05-03-2012, 04:57 PM   #8
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


That sure looks like a support coloum on the other side of the wall, how would you open up the wall that wide if that's suppoting something above it?
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Old 05-03-2012, 05:45 PM   #9
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


I have since opened up the sheet rock at the top areas and discovered it is indeed a load bearing wall. I now believe that if I took the entire wall down, I'd probably be in trouble. But since I only need to take half down to create an entryway into the next room, I should be ok. I see that there is already a header going across the opening where I have cut, which works out great. But I do wonder why this header is already in the wall. I would think they could have used taller studs and just gone all the way to the ceiling. What made them decide to put a header inside this wall at exactly this height? Doesn't that just cause more work to add the additional boards above this header? Is it normal to find header boards ready for usage inside walls? I thought I was going to have to add it myself once I opened it up. Weird.
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Old 05-03-2012, 05:56 PM   #10
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


If you are referring to the stud on "right" side of photo, then taking this and the other 3 studs out to make the entry way should be ok. There is a header already in place. (see my previous comment about this) I am curious why it's already there, ready to be useful.
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Old 05-03-2012, 06:17 PM   #11
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
That sure looks like a support coloum on the other side of the wall, how would you open up the wall that wide if that's suppoting something above it?
Looks like a cats scratch toy.
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Old 05-03-2012, 06:20 PM   #12
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


On second look your right, opps.
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Old 05-03-2012, 06:35 PM   #13
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


Quote:
Originally Posted by waitingtohear View Post
I am curious why it's already there, ready to be useful.
probably at the time of the framing they planned on an opening. for some reason either they decided to make it solid or someone at a later date decided to close it in.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:47 PM   #14
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


I was thinking that also. I think they were going to make it the master bedroom. But decided to make it a 4 bedroom home rather than 3.

Because now the home doesn't have any bedroom that is larger than the rest. It also explains why one room has it's own original sliding glass door for such a small room.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:50 PM   #15
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interior wall frame has an angled piece at bottom of one stud. Why!


at least it will save you time and money in framing the opening

good luck with your project!

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