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Old 01-29-2009, 03:58 PM   #31
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


I am putting Dow Super Tuff-R foam insulation on the block walls. http://building.dow.com/na/en/produc...supertuffr.htm

According to their website, you are supposed to use unfaced insulation betweeen the studs.
Interior Basement Wall (Foam and Stud Wall Framing) – Installing STYROFOAM™ Square Edge, Tongue & Groove, SCOREBOARD™, Super TUFF-R™, or TUFF-R

1. Install insulation over interior side of basement wall. Foam insulation may be held in place temporarily using spots of compatible adhesive.
2. Build conventional wood stud wall that firmly presses foam insulation against basement wall.
3. Install unfaced batts in stud cavities.
4. Install drywall over studs.
5. Tape and finish drywall according to manufacturer's directions

How does the unfaced insulation stay between the wall studs as nothing is being stapled to the studs?


Last edited by daveyd; 01-29-2009 at 04:02 PM.
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Old 01-29-2009, 05:23 PM   #32
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


It seems like the fiberglass will settle over the years. Did they say anything about a vapor barrier (retarder) or does the foam board act as one. I guess they don't suggest it if they say to use unfaced. Does it tell you to seal and tape the seams of the boards and to use sprayfoam at the top and bottom of the boards? If the foamboard is your vapor barrier, it has to be completely sealed.

I don't know why you couldn't use faced insulation so that you at least have an edge to staple it between the studs up at the top, but just slash the paper as you would if you were adding a second layer of batt insulation in an attic. You'll want to get someone else's opinion about it.
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Old 01-29-2009, 06:37 PM   #33
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


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Originally Posted by gma2rjc View Post
It seems like the fiberglass will settle over the years. Did they say anything about a vapor barrier (retarder) or does the foam board act as one. I guess they don't suggest it if they say to use unfaced. Does it tell you to seal and tape the seams of the boards and to use sprayfoam at the top and bottom of the boards? If the foamboard is your vapor barrier, it has to be completely sealed.

I don't know why you couldn't use faced insulation so that you at least have an edge to staple it between the studs up at the top, but just slash the paper as you would if you were adding a second layer of batt insulation in an attic. You'll want to get someone else's opinion about it.

Yea, you definitely have to tape the seams. The faom has a foil on it that acts as a vapor barrier. I would think that if you used faced insulation, you would have a double vapor barrier. I wouls assume that would be a bad thing...but what do I know
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Old 01-29-2009, 08:27 PM   #34
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


You're right, you don't want a double vapor barrier. That's why, if you slice holes in the facing of the batts, it's no longer considered a vapor barrier. That's true for an attic. Now that I think about it though, it might not hold true if it's covered with drywall.
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Old 01-29-2009, 09:47 PM   #35
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


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Originally Posted by daveyd View Post
I am putting Dow Super Tuff-R foam insulation on the block walls. http://building.dow.com/na/en/produc...supertuffr.htm

According to their website, you are supposed to use unfaced insulation betweeen the studs.
Interior Basement Wall (Foam and Stud Wall Framing) – Installing STYROFOAM™ Square Edge, Tongue & Groove, SCOREBOARD™, Super TUFF-R™, or TUFF-R

1. Install insulation over interior side of basement wall. Foam insulation may be held in place temporarily using spots of compatible adhesive.
2. Build conventional wood stud wall that firmly presses foam insulation against basement wall.
3. Install unfaced batts in stud cavities.
4. Install drywall over studs.
5. Tape and finish drywall according to manufacturer's directions

How does the unfaced insulation stay between the wall studs as nothing is being stapled to the studs?
Its a friction fit until its sandwiched between the foam and the drywall!
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Old 02-01-2009, 02:43 PM   #36
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


Any tips on how to install the 4x8 sheets of foam board onto the block walls when the foam boards are bowed? This is a real pain...I am using Liquid Nails to attach the foam to the block but when I push the bottom of the foam onto the wall, the top pops out an inch or so.

If I look at the foam boards, i can see they are bowed out. Any ideas?
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:15 PM   #37
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


I used to work for a defense contractor. We did a lot of "Black Ops" rooms where the sound transmission through walls, windows, doors, ceilings, pipes, and flooring had to pass rigid government DB tests.

Fiberglass insulation was right at the bottom of the list when it came to dampening sound transmissions. Hardly much better than just open air.

Engineered boards, rubber type sheets, isolation stand-offs for the board insulation, and total double-wall separation were the most effective applications.

I think you will be disappointed with just fiberglass. Honestly, just a single sheet of 5/8" drywall will do better for you if you choose not to go with the sound board.
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Last edited by Willie T; 02-01-2009 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 02-02-2009, 10:22 AM   #38
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


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Engineered boards, rubber type sheets, isolation stand-offs for the board insulation
Are 'engineered boards' MDF, OSB etc.? What are 'rubber type sheets' and who sells them? What do you mean by 'isolation stand-offs for the board insulation'?
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Old 02-02-2009, 10:57 AM   #39
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Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound


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Originally Posted by gma2rjc View Post
Are 'engineered boards' MDF, OSB etc.? What are 'rubber type sheets' and who sells them? What do you mean by 'isolation stand-offs for the board insulation'?
  • 'engineered boards' : No, I mean construction wall material that is engineered to reduce sound transmissions. It usually comes in sheets (boards)
  • 'rubber type sheets' : Roll-out sheets of open -celled (not hard and stiff) rubber-like material that does not permit good transmission of sound through it. Try a Goodyear dealer.
  • 'isolation stand-offs' : These can be almost anything (even homemade) that will isolate the direct connection of one material to another. In the case we are discussing, these would made of a non-sound-transmitting substance.

    ie: A strip of rubber with wood bonded to one side.
    Envision screwing a series of these strips perpendicular to the bottoms of your joists (wood side, down). Now, you mount your ceiling drywall to these strips, screwing the drywall only in locations where the screws will NOT go into the joists.

    This will discourage the direct transmission of sound through the hard joists that would ordinarily occur if the drywall was snugged up tight and solid against those joists with screws or nails. As difficult as it may be to believe, significant sound can travel right through the screws or nails, themselves, into the fibers of the joists, and on up through the tightly fastened flooring above.

    The main concept to sound deadening is to detour the sound waves. Sound travels very poorly around random corners... thats why you have a hard time hearing your spouse out in the kitchen... it's not direct sound transmission.
You can find out a lot about this stuff online. It's a whole world unto itself.

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