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Old 12-08-2008, 03:27 PM   #1
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insulating tight spots


hi all - I'm insulating my place - now working on remaining ceiling space. I'm using Roxul rock-wool batts and in the wide open spaces and larger cuts, this stuff really goes in nice.

As you all know however, there are some really tight spots in the framing where it's a real pain to cut and fit the stuff in snug. I was looking at the bags of the recycled paper stuff (blown in - cellulose?) at Home Depot and thinking a few bags of this just poured into the really tight spots (roxul batts up to that point) would work well for filling these small voids. Then I was looking at the couple big bags of roxul scraps I have piled up from the work so far (destined for the dump) and I'm wondering if I could use this stuff up instead.

I could literally take a couple of roxul scraps at a time and kinda scrape them together - the stuff breaks apart into smaller pieces. I could drop / tuck these into the voids best effort and pile it up pretty high. A bit extra (and tedious) work but less stuff going to waste.

Why throw out the scraps and go buy more stuff if I can salvage the odds and ends? Is this a decent idea? I'm not sure if the R value goes out the window once you break the rock wool into little pieces...?

thanks

-randy

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Old 12-08-2008, 03:50 PM   #2
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insulating tight spots


Sometimes you can't get insulation in. In that case just try and get it in there the best you can.

Foam is an option but be careful because too much can ooz out and can end up needed to be cut out after it expands.

I wouldn't worry about the R value as this is so small it will make little difference in the overall heat/cool retention.

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Old 12-08-2008, 03:56 PM   #3
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The Big Box Stores sell small packs of fiberglass insulation. Also, you could use expanding spray foam in a can.
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Old 12-08-2008, 07:16 PM   #4
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Quote:
Then I was looking at the couple big bags of roxul scraps I have piled up from the work so far (destined for the dump) and I'm wondering if I could use this stuff up instead.

I could literally take a couple of roxul scraps at a time and kinda scrape them together - the stuff breaks apart into smaller pieces. I could drop / tuck these into the voids best effort and pile it up pretty high. A bit extra (and tedious) work but less stuff going to waste.

Why throw out the scraps and go buy more stuff if I can salvage the odds and ends? Is this a decent idea?
Ayuh,... That'll Work...

The whole Idea of Insulation is to stop drafts,+ create a Dead Air Space.....
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:18 AM   #5
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I did consider spray foam (the cans) but these spots are just big enough that i'd probably go thru a pile of cans (wish I had a working camera to post a pic) yet just small enough to make cut-and-fit a real problem. Kinda in the middle - Murphy's law i guess. I'm not a die hard tree hugger but if I can use up the scraps without compromising the job I'd feel a bit better about the whole thing. Even using some environmentally friendly stuff to do this (I was told the cellulose is old recycled newsprint with boric acid, etc. added) defeats the "green" intent in the big picture, if I'm dragging the same amount (or more) of unused scraps to the dump in the end.

I feel better about just going ahead and using up the leftovers now - thanks all for the replies.

PS I was also going to ask how much "waste" you guys would probably consider reasonable in residential insulation job (is there some rule of thumb, like 5% or 10% or something?), but then again maybe I don't want to know
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:50 AM   #6
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PS I was also going to ask how much "waste" you guys would probably consider reasonable in residential insulation job (is there some rule of thumb, like 5% or 10% or something?), but then again maybe I don't want to know
When I do insulation jobs I always buy more that I need. It costs me more money to go and get more than to buy extra. Then I can write off the insulation on that job and use the excess to insulate my house.

I also store excess insulation for the next job. Problem is that it does take up a lot of space compared to other stuff but I am pretty good at estimating what I need and don't often end up with too much.
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Old 12-09-2008, 04:44 PM   #7
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...I feel better about just going ahead and using up the leftovers now - thanks all for the replies.
That's sounds like a good plan. Nothing wrong with using your leftover insulation scraps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtoni View Post
PS I was also going to ask how much "waste" you guys would probably consider reasonable in residential insulation job (is there some rule of thumb, like 5% or 10% or something?), but then again maybe I don't want to know
Generally, there isn't much waste (cut-offs) left.
We use up all we can for the scraps, on the smaller areas.

What ever full batts or sections are left, goes to the storage garages for the next job.

Definitely fill all bays/areas. Do not leave anything un-insulated. As stated, it can also be used as a draft stopper.
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Old 12-10-2008, 09:33 AM   #8
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great feedback and advice here as usual - thanks everyone....

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