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Old 12-16-2009, 08:08 AM   #16
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Insulating a cold/well room?


Quote:
Bondo - Not sure what a heat tape cord is.
Ayuh,.. Your new pictures, while Way Too Big, shows what I thought was a heat tape cord, is the Ground wire,... Sorry 'bout that...

As for your What to use question,... Again, My opinion,...
I'd stuff the crack over the door with plain ole Fiberglass,...
The smaller cracks can be sealed with spray foam, or even just plain ole latex Chaulking...
You're trying to stop the Wind, more than Insulate it...
I'd be chaulking the sillcock Both inside, And outside, myself...

'ell,... a year or so ago, I thought I'd tighten up along the outside of the 100 year old Sieve I live in, along the foundation,...
What I thought would take a can or 2 of spray foam, turned into a bag of mortar,+ a Dozen cans of spray foam...

The only reason I mention this is, If your getting a draft from Over the door, it would appear you've got drafts Above the ceiling...
Which, with the little I know, makes the entire parimeter of the foundation, Suspect...

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Old 12-16-2009, 12:32 PM   #17
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Insulating a cold/well room?


IMO , I would foam with at least 1" on the walls clear to the floor, 2" on the ceiling. ( foamular150 with pl300 or pl premium glue).

Granted the vast majority of heat loss is from the ceiling to the frost line , but I would try to get this rooms insulation close to that of the basement .

Plug the 3/4 gap with wood and caulk. Spray foam the cracks.

I would get rid of the glass insulation on the plumbing.

Why would you need it if your room is warm, also glass can hold moisture and I'd be leery of having anything in that room that could/would hold moisture.

You have the potentials for water infiltration ( cinder block walls , ceiling to wall joint, future cracks in the ceiling cap) at some future time , it may never happen but it could.

I would not only leave the door vent open but consider adding a top vent for natural air flow.

IMO these rooms are meant to be safe rooms/tornado rooms ( I've heard them called fraidy rooms in Kansas).

What you wish to use it for is your business but you could consider a fire rated steel door and could even harden it to fema standards or even put a fema rated door on(google this).

Now if you install a steel door you would want to keep it slightly ajar for airflow to prevent any possible humidity/heat issues.
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:28 PM   #18
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Insulating a cold/well room?


alright lynch, i am wonder what to do with my basement well room as well(pardon the pun). I too live in mpls. my specialty is hvac. and there are many things to consider. 1- well rooms were never meant to be finished off ,( your home is most likely from the 50s) people did not plan on finishing basements in the 50s( note the low ceilings). 2- the vent the previous owners put in was a good thing ( a block wall half in the dirt tends to get cold in Minnesota and freezes **** )3- the paper wrapped around the water pipe does not insulate the pipe from cold but keeps water off the floor. come summer you will want some type of wrap around the pipe( cold pipes condensate) the paper seems to work but there is better materials out there.
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:29 PM   #19
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Insulating a cold/well room?


further note i know im a few years lat but there might be others out there
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:04 PM   #20
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Insulating a cold/well room?


Just insulate the walls and ceiling of the "well pit" very well with XPS(2"+) , put in an additional vent into the door to make that part of the conditioned space in the home. Make sure you have a cold air return low in the the basement. Then toss the the insulation around the pipes and complication of the piping and make things simpler and more comfortable and possibly more economical. It also lets you get the warm very dry air into the sealed pit keep everything in decent condition.

If you do have central air, the cooler basement can actually reduce the AC load because of the low return if your basement is not "wet" or extremely humid. If it is humid, use a vent on the return that can be shut in the summer.

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Old 02-08-2013, 10:15 PM   #21
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Insulating a cold/well room?


The dew point is currently falling on the inside of the masonry block. If you insulate with about 2 inches of Extruded Polystyrene like Dow Styrofoam (EXPS Not EPS (Bead Board) you should move the dew point into the middle of the insulation. Thats where you want it. I Know I Know, fire blah blah blah.
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:34 PM   #22
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Insulating a cold/well room?


jagas -

It is officially XPS (Extruded polystyrene). Expanded polystyrene is EPS (Expanded polystyrene), which is what coffee cups and meat trays from Walmart are made from.

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Old 02-09-2013, 07:51 AM   #23
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Insulating a cold/well room?


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Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post

If you do have central air, the cooler basement can actually reduce the AC load because of the low return if your basement is not "wet" or extremely humid. If it is humid, use a vent on the return that can be shut in the summer.

Dick
Hopefully this question isn't too far off of the OP subject but this is something I've often wondered about.

If the above is true about cooling, why is the basement omitted when figuring HVAC load calculations?
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Old Today, 02:49 PM   #24
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Insulating a cold/well room?


I live in Minneapolis too. My house was built in 50s with a well room under front steps. That room smeels up the whole house! We tried air freshers, charcole, resealing outside steps and caulk, and painting interior with basement waterproofing paint. Door is uninsulated with no vent. Any ideas?

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