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-   -   Installing a wood burning stove. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/installing-wood-burning-stove-156476/)

rickjames8 09-11-2012 03:35 AM

Installing a wood burning stove.
 
Hello,

I am about to start the installation of a wood burning stove.

Here is a good example of the stove I'd like to install:
http://www.leboncoin.fr/bricolage/364708652.htm?ca=4_s
Some have the exhaust pipe exit on top, others on the back.

Here is the chimney I am working with.
http://travelhead.com/images/img315.jpg

As you can see, there is no opening. The wood stove will go where the table now sits (the thermostat will be relocated for obvious reasons :)). There was a wood stove in this location about 50 years ago. The little white column is actually hollow (its a series of square hollow concrete blocks stacked on top of one another). There is a metal flue inside, as I can see it coming out the top, yet I don't know how far it goes down.

My install will look like fig#2 or fig#3 in this illustration, with the exception that my pipe will be contained within these hollow blocks.
http://www.hearth.com/econtent/image...nschimneys.gif

My question is this.

I'll need to make a hole in the side of this stack to route the exhaust in to it. Do I need to make a second hole somewhere lower to remove soot now and then? Because the stove will not sit directly under the chimney, the soot will not return to the stove. Or, do I simply put in a metal 90deg bend inside the concrete blocks where the exhaust goes in to the chimney and attempt to clean it out by removing the exhaust pipe each time and just clean out the bend?

Thanks,
-Rick

oh'mike 09-11-2012 06:34 AM

The original 'thimble' should be at 6 to 7 feet high---with a metal cap---use a magnet to find it--

Your old chimney may not be up to standards for your new stove-----also---the new stove pictured is set very close to the wall---which might work but may not meet code in the USA---if it's a low heat stove---it might require a small flue--so pick the stove before installing your chimney or you may find they won't work together---

Matching the chimney to the stove is critical----to big and it won't draft----to small and you can't use the stove at all---

You want 'just right'.

rickjames8 09-11-2012 08:47 AM

Mike,

Thanks for the awesome tips. I'll hunt around with a magnet and see if I can find the old thimble. I've been able to measure the pipe diameter, so I'll do some interneting to see if I can figure out the proper stove for it.

Do you have any suggestions for the original question of soot removal?

-Rick

PS. The stove in the ad was typical of the ones we're looking at - not the actual one.

oh'mike 09-11-2012 09:12 AM

Typically,a T is installed --not a 90--so soot and ash have a place to drop without creating a restriction in the flue---this need to be vacuumed out one a year or so----

I keep my heating bill low by using a wood stove--I have a triple walled stainless steel flue--with a T at the point where the thimble enter the room.

rickjames8 09-11-2012 10:36 AM

oops - i reposted my orig reply. sorry.

rickjames8 09-11-2012 10:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1007604)
Typically,a T is installed --not a 90--so soot and ash have a place to drop without creating a restriction in the flue---this need to be vacuumed out one a year or so----

Ok. I guess my question is more "how do I access that area at the bottom of the T"? Do I just disconnect the stove once a year and stick a vacuum down inside, or do I make a second hole in the chimney just below the T so I can access that way?

Thanks,
-Rick

oh'mike 09-11-2012 10:43 AM

No need for a hole--just remove the stove smoke stack and reach in---it's only a few inches---if you use the stove a lot you need to check for creosote build up at least once a year anyway---

rickjames8 10-30-2012 10:21 AM

stove plan
 
A few other projects put this on hold, but now I'm back at it.

I've knocked a hole in the chimney at the place where the liner ends. I was able to determine that this is where the old stove entered the chimney because the absence of a cap on top has allowed rain water in and thus stained the wall where the liner ended.

I selected a Godin wood stove based on the size of the liner (16cm) and the volume of the house (100cuM).

I'd like to detail my plans and see if people think they're good, or see ways I can improve them.

1. Install a cap on top of the stack.
2. Relocate the thermostat for the radiators
3. Enlarge the hole in the chimney big enough to be able to insert a T
4. Put a cap on the lower end of the T, attach the upward end to the chimney liner, and attach a thimble to the end pointing outwards.
5. Attach all necessary pipes from the stove to the thimble, making the connection to the thimble removable for a once-a-year cleaning.

My questions:
1. How to attach the T to the liner (I'm imagining a large hose clamp?) ,
2. How to attach the T to the thimble
3. What to rebuild the area around the thimble with? (The chimney is made of hollow prefab concrete "chimney blocks" on top of each other. Would I just patch with concrete over wire mesh?

Photos of the stove and hole:
http://travelhead.com/images/stove1.jpghttp://travelhead.com/images/stove2.jpg

md2lgyk 10-30-2012 12:18 PM

What sort of wall is that behind the stove? Unless it's masonry, the stove is way too close to it.

notmrjohn 10-30-2012 01:05 PM

Bottom pic is liner/flue? Doesn't look to be in best of shape. Have you had chimney inspector involved in this at all? Consider replacing it with zero clearance vent.

While your at that you could extend soot collector to floor, put in door.

Make sure walls can withstand heat, you may need additional protection. Then apply fire brick or tile to reflect heat into room. A small slow moving fan pointed towards wall.

That's bad location for thermostat to begin with, no circulation in corner.

1. How to attach the T to the liner (I'm imagining a large hose clamp?) , Use screws to fasten sections together. Caulk joints with stove or stove pipe caulking or sealant..
2. How to attach the T to the thimble Stove pipe passes thru some thimbles no direct attachment. Other thimbles also act as a section of pipe, attachment to pipe, if any, depends on manufacturer. Some come with separate gaskets, and sealants. Be sure you use insulated thimble. Follow manufacturer's instructions.
3. What to rebuild the area around the thimble with? There are thimble covers or plates, to cover opening. Some require a match to thimble, others are more universal or generic. Its gonna depend on what thimble you use. Again, follow manufacturers instructions.

rickjames8 10-30-2012 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 1040962)
What sort of wall is that behind the stove? Unless it's masonry, the stove is way too close to it.

It is a red brick wall covered in about 1/2" of plaster.

rickjames8 10-30-2012 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by notmrjohn (Post 1040991)
Bottom pic is liner/flue? Doesn't look to be in best of shape. Have you had chimney inspector involved in this at all? Consider replacing it with zero clearance vent.

I have not had an inspector look at it, but I guess I probably should. It looks a bit better in person than it does in the photo. When I shine a flashlight in there it looks good, but with the flash it looks messy.

Quote:

While your at that you could extend soot collector to floor, put in door.
But I think this would require removing the entire side of the chimney in order to place the liner all the way to the bottom. The T seemed like the easier option.

Quote:

Make sure walls can withstand heat, you may need additional protection. Then apply fire brick or tile to reflect heat into room. A small slow moving fan pointed towards wall.
I was using the fact that there was a wood stove there decades ago as a sign that the walls were probably ok. Maybe not a good assumption?

Fix'n it 10-30-2012 09:30 PM

what is the climate there ?
have you looked at the chimney in the attic ?

oh'mike 10-30-2012 11:02 PM

To avoid to much destruction--you could use a 90 instead of a T--you need to check the pipe regularly for soot or creosote if you go that route---

You would do well to hire a chimney/stove outfit to set that up for you---It's difficult for a layman to buy the special chimney liner parts and clamps

If you are going to do this your self---find a supplier that can walk you through the steps of properly attaching the T or 90 to the flue liner---if you cut any of the masonry---repairs are not my specialty---but several masons hang out here---one may offer good advice.


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