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Old 01-24-2008, 11:45 AM   #1
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Installing Attic Sub-Floor


I just purchased a new house that has an unfinished bonus room space in the attic (tall ceilings and regular interior stairs up to the attic).

I would like to build a finished room up there eventually, but for the time being I am looking to put down some flooring to turn the space into usable storage. I want to make sure that the wood I use now will work once I decide to finish out the entire room. I assumed I'd need some type of 4x8 sheets of Ply or OSB for this, but see so many types! Which type of wood do I want? What thickness do I need? Does it matter if the wood is tongue and groove? Can I fasten the wood directly to the rafters? Does it matter how I orient the boards? Last but not least, can i cover up the can lights that this space is above? There are rolled tin sleeves sticking up from them with insulation all around. The last thing I want to do is create a fire hazard or heat issue with the lights.

Thanks in advance for any help and advice!


Last edited by 00u6166; 01-24-2008 at 02:00 PM.
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Old 01-24-2008, 01:54 PM   #2
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Installing Attic Sub-Floor


You mentioned attaching to the rafters...I'm assuming you meant to the ceiling joists, that you will be using as floor joists in the attic. (hope I'm not confusing you).

What dimension and spacing are these joists? (2x4, 2x6, 16 or 24 in. on center)...need to determine if you can use this for anything more than storage.

3/4 ply perpendicular to joists, t&g is an option, cans need to be labeled "ic" for insulating.

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Old 01-24-2008, 01:58 PM   #3
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Installing Attic Sub-Floor


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Originally Posted by cnydave View Post
You mentioned attaching to the rafters...I'm assuming you meant to the ceiling joists, that you will be using as floor joists in the attic. (hope I'm not confusing you).

What dimension and spacing are these joists? (2x4, 2x6, 16 or 24 in. on center)...need to determine if you can use this for anything more than storage.

3/4 ply perpendicular to joists, t&g is an option, cans need to be labeled "ic" for insulating.
Sorry, I'm not completely versed on all the proper terminology...I did mean ceiling joists. The joists are 2x6, 16 on center. So if the cans are labeled "IC" i'm good to cover them up? I'm assuming if they are labeled something else they will need to be replaced first?

Thanks for the quick reply!
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Old 01-24-2008, 02:01 PM   #4
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Installing Attic Sub-Floor


actually, I need to go home and measure the joists...they might even be 2x8 (if that's even possible). I do know that they are 16 inches apart though.
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Old 01-24-2008, 04:26 PM   #5
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Installing Attic Sub-Floor


Sure anythings possible

Also what is the size of the proposed room, is there a bearing wall under the room (perpendicular to joists)? Will you have duct supplied heat/ac, electricity? Consider these b4 flooring. Your set sub floor will be glued and screwed, think ahead, makes things easier.

IC cans can contact insulation. Yes to your question, assuming your joists clear them.
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Old 01-26-2008, 03:00 PM   #6
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Installing Attic Sub-Floor


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Originally Posted by cnydave View Post
Sure anythings possible

Also what is the size of the proposed room, is there a bearing wall under the room (perpendicular to joists)? Will you have duct supplied heat/ac, electricity? Consider these b4 flooring. Your set sub floor will be glued and screwed, think ahead, makes things easier.

IC cans can contact insulation. Yes to your question, assuming your joists clear them.
I just went up today and measured the joists. They are bigger than I thought, each one is a 2"x12". The room or floored area would be approximately 12'x15'. It is above my kitchen, so no load bearing walls are underneath this spot (only on the very edges of where the room will be). Does having the large 12" joists make up for not having a load bearing wall below? To answer the other questions, I will have duct supplied heat (the furnace is in the attic right beside the room and is large enough to handle more sq footage. I will also have electricity to this room for a single light / fan, but that should be pretty easy. I do not plan on placing any plumbing in this room.

Also, does having bigger joists afford me the ability to buy thinner subfloor? I see that you can buy 3/4 inch subfloor for pretty cheap (much cheaper than the 1 1/4 stuff. Sorry for so many questions, and thanks for your help. If pictures would help I can take some tomorrow or Monday and post them on this thread.

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