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Old 04-30-2012, 03:45 PM   #1
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inside door framing


can anybody explain why this tutorial calls for a door frame composition that is more complex (in terms of the number of pieces) than what you would consider minimal?

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-...h-opening.aspx

e.g., i would expect the side studs would be just single 2x4s while the header would be just a horizontally placed 2x4 with the 2 side facing out. these instructions call for doubled up side studs and a header that consists of 2 2x6 (or 2x8s) with a 1/2" plywood spacer with the wide side facing out.

basically, my question is why can't you do it in a simple format with a minimal composition of components, what happens if you do, i.e. what requires this more complex setup?

thanks

P.S.: i am not arguing in favor of the more simplistic method described above. just curious as to the reasoning behind the one in the tutorial.


Last edited by amakarevic; 04-30-2012 at 03:54 PM.
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Old 04-30-2012, 05:00 PM   #2
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inside door framing


Re read that tutorial. He says that his plans call for the 2x8 header. He talks about using a single 2x4 for non load bearing. The double studs on the sides help to stiffen the sides and gives more nailing surface for the casing.

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Old 04-30-2012, 05:06 PM   #3
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inside door framing


so are you saying if the wall is not load bearing, single posts on the sides are fine along with a flat positioned 2x4 for the header?
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Old 04-30-2012, 05:19 PM   #4
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I still like the sides doubled. Especially if a heavier door is used. Even if the opening is wrapped in drywall rather than a door installed, it will take abuse better on impacts. The single 2x4 header is ok, as long as were not talking about a bigger opening.
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Old 04-30-2012, 05:28 PM   #5
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i got a very simple and very light door from HD. the wall is not load bearing. you think single poles are fine?
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Old 04-30-2012, 05:46 PM   #6
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If you are all set to go and don't have two more studs, then go for it. If you have two there, put them in.
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Old 04-30-2012, 06:05 PM   #7
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Good luck tying to get the casing to lay flat with nothing on the outside to nail it to.
Any door even inside doors have been installed with a king and jack studs for a reason for well over 100 years, Without the header and a spacer the header is not going to come out even with both sides of the sheetrock.
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Old 04-30-2012, 06:09 PM   #8
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doubled up studs on each side of any door opening is standard construction practice. it stiffens up the assembly which makes the door frame far less likely to be knocked out of alignement after the fact..

try to move a doubled stud by knocking into it.. not much is going to happen.. now try a single stud it can move up to 1/2"... i know aparment complex builders that use steel stud with nothing more than a peice of strapping for nailing the door jambs too.. a month after people have moved in they have a list a mile long of door's that need to be reset
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Old 04-30-2012, 06:16 PM   #9
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i can double up, no prob
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:18 PM   #10
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joe, the same can be said about modern pocket door kits with the split jambs... i hate the bloody things.. no matter what you do there will always be issues with them, either the split jamb warps and causes the door to rub or the fact the door hangs off of a track allowing it to warp also causes it to rub on jamb...

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