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-   -   Ideas for how to fašade over a glue lam beam? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/ideas-how-fa-ade-over-glue-lam-beam-70574/)

kindrox 05-05-2010 09:21 AM

Ideas for how to fašade over a glue lam beam?
 
I am making a gluelam frame for my patio cover. In the picture below it is not yet complete - there will be 8 rows of boards, and the total linear footage of the frame is about 80 feet. I thought I might like this look but as it completes I think I would like a facade over it.

I thought I would see what (potentially radical) ideas others might have. One complication is that some of the beams have been curved slightly in anticipation of any snow loading. I could see going as far out as covering in hardie backer board and doing ? ? ?

http://www.posylane.com/images/P1020006.JPG

Scuba_Dave 05-05-2010 09:54 AM

Glue lam outside ?
I didn't think they were rated for exposure

tpolk 05-05-2010 09:58 AM

did you build those? what are they made of?

12penny 05-05-2010 10:10 AM

kindrox....I'm afraid I dont have your vision. What goes on top?

kindrox 05-05-2010 10:50 AM

Quote:

I didn't think they were rated for exposure
I used titebond III glue, and every 8 inches there are two 3.5 inch deck screws going down. I clamp each board, doing one in the morning and one at night. So far I have just finished my second gallon of glue, putting me right on target for using three gallons total. From the recommended glue thickness and the total board feet, I had estimated how much glue I should be using.

Quote:

did you build those? what are they made of?
They are 2 x 10 yellow pine boards. They will be stacked to 12 inches high. I just started putting in row 6, and at five rows it is rock solid to walk / spring up and down on.

Quote:

What goes on top?
In general it will be a row of 2 x 6's like a pergola, and on that I'll put clear roofing materital. The idea I have for a facade (so far) is ceder fencing. If I do this, I'll use ceder 2 x 6's.

It is not shown, but each bend (this structure is 5 sided, so two 90's in the corners and 4 45's) will have a steel plate brace long bolted or screwed to the wood. Mostly for show as I don't think I need it structurely. In the corners the boards overlap, alternating each row.

Also not shown is the center beam running from the house out to the long side of the pentagram. From the edge beam to the center beam is 11 feet, so the frame at it's widest is 22 feet.

The pillars have not been "concrete washed" yet so still look unfinished.

Thurman 05-05-2010 08:20 PM

So you're using glue and screws, but why are they lying on their sides? Even with the glue and screws wouldn't they eventually sag being placed on their sides? David

kindrox 05-06-2010 10:14 AM

Quote:

So you're using glue and screws, but why are they lying on their sides? Even with the glue and screws wouldn't they eventually sag being placed on their sides?
I belive Titebond III will allow some slippage so all beams are either built with a hump up, or are designed to be ok if they droop. The beams are large for effect, not for loading. We do get a little snow in Texas but not often and it does not last long, so I don't think there are going to be a lot of forces trying to get the glue to slip.

tpolk 05-06-2010 10:29 AM

without proper clamping during the glue up process i would be afraid you are going to get checking, cupping and warping. did you try to alternate grain patterns? usually a good exterior wood treatment would be used on each board prior to glue up and a good epoxy resin glue for final glue up. good luck

kindrox 05-06-2010 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tpolk (Post 438237)
without proper clamping during the glue up process i would be afraid you are going to get checking, cupping and warping. did you try to alternate grain patterns? usually a good exterior wood treatment would be used on each board prior to glue up and a good epoxy resin glue for final glue up. good luck

I clamp each board, doing one in the morning and one at night. Initially I was going to use a urathane glue but then I found a number of people who had used titebond outside in structural applications much more difficult than mine and had good luck with it. Plus the weather here is just a little cold for urathane glue right now.

I didn't alternate grain patterns, I have kept the crown up on each board. I was recommended to do that for moisture shedding.

Gary in WA 05-06-2010 09:37 PM

I recommend you obtain a Building permit.

Be safe, Gary

jogr 05-07-2010 10:16 PM

Neat project Kindrox. How did you find out how to do the laminated beams? Be sure to post pics when done.

kindrox 05-07-2010 10:30 PM

I first thought about doing solid wood of course, but large solid wood was going to be very expensive, and on top of that it would be expensive and possibly dangerous to get the wood up and bolted together. I wanted something I could do myself.

There is a lot of information out there on gluelam beams which convinced me to go that route. The glue choice was really up to me, since my engineer indicated the strength required in my case was very small compared to the size of the finished product I wanted.

There are other glue choices but everything but Titebond III (epoxy, urethane) had application difficulties that made it difficult to be sure I could do it myself, and apply them correctly.

My glue choice was irrelevant to the engineer, the beams might sag a little more if I only used screws, but would not fall down (there are going to be long screws at the end tying together all the layers). So even though titebond might slip with time, I arched the beams to compensate.

I didnĺt know exactly how this was going to look until it was up. Right now I am leaning towards a cedar fašade.


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