Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-12-2009, 10:20 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2
Share |
Default

i beam strength


i need to know is it stronger to weld to i beam side by side or weld channel iron to each side of one i beam as i need to move a house

larry pederson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2009, 11:40 PM   #2
Structural Engineer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 64
Default

i beam strength


Completely depends on the size of the sections you are considering, what specific type of steel they are made of, and what the weld detail is.

But, my gut says a wide flange shape (i-beam) with a channel on each side would be stronger. Due to the fact that all elements (flange or web) would be considered "stiffened" according to the AISC, reducing the chances of local buckling.


Last edited by wildcat; 04-12-2009 at 11:52 PM.
wildcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2009, 09:37 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2
Default

i beam strength


i thank you for your educated gut feeling. the beams are going to be 75 ft. ill be lifting on the beams about 65 ft. apart . i would like to use
32# 12 inch i beam and of course 3by 12 inch channel iron. i dont know if it should be welded solid all the way or space the weld.got any idea on this.any opinion on these ideas are greatly apprecited.
larry pederson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2009, 09:43 PM   #4
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,118
Default

i beam strength


Truly you are a brave man, the average person getting ready to move a house would consult with a structural engineer regarding the required size, spacing, and stiffening of the beams, and would want a specific procedure for moving the house. Please let us know how your move goes.
Daniel Holzman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2009, 12:39 AM   #5
Structural Engineer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 64
Default

i beam strength


Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
Truly you are a brave man, the average person getting ready to move a house would consult with a structural engineer regarding the required size, spacing, and stiffening of the beams, and would want a specific procedure for moving the house. Please let us know how your move goes.
This is a tremendous idea. If something were to go wrong and someone gets a minor injury you will be in deep, deep crap if you didn't consult with a structural engineer.

The house could potentially be uninsurable if something goes wrong with it and an engineer has not be consulted.
wildcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2009, 07:34 AM   #6
Structural Engineer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 64
Default

i beam strength


Quote:
Originally Posted by fast1 View Post
what would the insurance company need before they approve a claim?
Well, if a professional contractor (house mover) is doing the work, then that contractor is bonded and insured to do such tasks.

If you're doing something like this on your own, I would assume you would need to check your homeowners policy to see if it would even cover this. It would make sense that an insurance company require a professional to handle such a task. Insurance policies vary widely, so you would need to check with your agent or policy issuer on the specifics. I'm just assuming this is a potential problem based on the fact that some insurance companies require proof of building permits for work done to homes, or they won't insure.

wildcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OSB Stronger than Plywood? Weathermaker01 Flooring 15 12-22-2012 09:06 AM
Q:Temp support to replace beam and posts on deck dougq Building & Construction 10 09-02-2008 04:24 PM
Beam Replacement? Steve Dailey Carpentry 5 05-19-2008 08:46 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.