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Old 06-16-2011, 09:37 PM   #16
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


You have issues, from the neighbor to the right with the raised drive, to the fact that the grade slopes to your home. Bad situation that needs a lot of work to get the water away or drained from the structure & garage.

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Old 06-16-2011, 09:40 PM   #17
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


Here is the sump pump, it is filling but not from the drain tile. Just water seeping in through the weep holes. The gray pipe coming in from the drain tile is completely dry. The sides near the door are all wet; so water is flowing down into the sump.

The weep holes I drilled in the stairs seem to have helped somewhat; as the water flow through the weep holes is much less.




The black pipe is apparently the worst french drain system ever...



It runs from the base of the triangular grass section and follows the sidewalk; then curves around the garage and goes under the brick stairs there... There is no crushed rock and there is no mesh covering until about 3 feet from the garage. Sorry they are hard to see; it started getting dark. The pipe wasn't buried very well either; there were large air pockets under long lengths of it.




Finally here is a fresh picture of the stairs; and a picture of the hole I dug tonight; I decided to dig in the window well as it couldn't collapse on me. I got about 5 inches from the depth of where the weep holes I drilled are. I started to hit a clay/mud substance about then. I couldn't really dig further without more equipment/time. I worked long hours again so I didn't start until late :-(





I hope I didn't miss answering any questions.

I'm working on a diagram of the yard and a plan of what I might like to do; but I want to wait and see if jomama comes down as it may change the plan...

Thanks for all the help so far!

edit: Thought I would add some information:

1) Multiple contractors said they "couldn't get a digger in the back yard to dig the foundation anyway".
2) Multiple contractors said they would only remove the stairs by taking down the top 2 and then filling it in.
3) All of the debri you see in the one picture (the large masonry bricks or whatever they are called) were dug out of the front side yard before regrading it. Some kind of crummy retaining wall thing.
4) Not pictured, on the neighbors to the west side; the grade is above the foundation at the back of the house; I'm having nightmares about that episode of Holmes were the main beam rotted because of this..

Last edited by coderguy; 06-16-2011 at 09:44 PM.
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Old 06-16-2011, 09:59 PM   #18
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


They actually make small units that you can stand up on to dig, or get a few helpers to help dig. You may have to get someone to run a camera in the weep tile to see if clogged, especially if no rock is on top of it, or no sock over it.
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Old 06-16-2011, 10:13 PM   #19
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


That's an interesting way to access the basement. Is that the only way or is there a way indoor too? If yes I would add a tarp or some other water seal over those doors to see if that stops water from getting in. At least as a temporary measure. Once you confirm you could do a more permanent fix. It looks like that whole foundation/area needs a lot of work though. I have a minor water problem compared to this and it can be quite costly and lot of work to do. Have not started on my project yet. Still debating between DIY or outsource. It's a lot of work that is involved.
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Old 06-17-2011, 10:49 AM   #20
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


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That's an interesting way to access the basement. Is that the only way or is there a way indoor too? If yes I would add a tarp or some other water seal over those doors to see if that stops water from getting in. At least as a temporary measure. Once you confirm you could do a more permanent fix. It looks like that whole foundation/area needs a lot of work though. I have a minor water problem compared to this and it can be quite costly and lot of work to do. Have not started on my project yet. Still debating between DIY or outsource. It's a lot of work that is involved.
Water isn't coming down the stairs; it is coming out of them. For a month period I tested this to make sure. I covered the window well and bilco with a tarp; and sealed it down; Didn't change anything.

I've been following your thread. My wife isn't happy when I bring up digging out the foundation myself; but I will if I have to.
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Old 06-17-2011, 10:50 AM   #21
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


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They actually make small units that you can stand up on to dig, or get a few helpers to help dig. You may have to get someone to run a camera in the weep tile to see if clogged, especially if no rock is on top of it, or no sock over it.
I've been trying to find something like this and I can't; any direct links or specific name I should be looking for?
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Old 06-17-2011, 10:53 AM   #22
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


This is an image from a foundation companies website:



This doesn't seem right to me? It has the grade above the joist instead of low on the foundation and the lightweight stone seems to go really high up the wall. These guys came out twice and both times I had a bad experience; so we didn't end up hiring them... but if this is what I should be going for; then I can start to plan?

Last edited by coderguy; 06-26-2011 at 02:35 PM. Reason: remove company name, didn't mean to be rude.
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Old 06-17-2011, 01:02 PM   #23
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


Yeah it seems odd. I'm no expert but it seems you don't want the grading too close to the siding / brick or other "decorative" surface. Figure that a typical winter may have anything from 2 to 6 feet or more of snow packed against the house depending on drifting. When that melts there is lot of surface water that will sit around for a while as the rest of the snow acts as a dam.

Also that's way too much gravel. It will actually "attract" water against the house. You only want like a foot, but they are on the right path with the filter fiber, I think this is better than the sock that goes around the draintile. Larger surface area means less chance of total clog. I would have it pass under the foam though, think of flashing or shingles.
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Old 06-17-2011, 01:40 PM   #24
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


I would say that who ever did the drawing was not paying attention. Most likely the person that did it, has never worked in construction, and was just given a raw picture or instructions to work from. Keep in mind that it is an example in how it should be done. The depth of the stone as shown, would be almost six feet deep.
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Old 06-19-2011, 01:00 PM   #25
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


Garage now has gutters... should help some.

526 Lincoln Victorian - AKA The New Money Pit
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Old 06-19-2011, 09:08 PM   #26
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


Quote:
Originally Posted by coderguy View Post
This is an image from American Foundation Specialists website:


This doesn't seem right to me? It has the grade above the joist instead of low on the foundation and the lightweight stone seems to go really high up the wall. These guys came out twice and both times I had a bad experience; so we didn't end up hiring them... but if this is what I should be going for; then I can start to plan?
That's fairly close to what we would do for a foundation repair as well, with a few exceptions:

- Obviously, the grade needs to be lower than the siding by at least 6" (optimally).
- We would just run the foam down to the footing to protect the damproof coating.
- We'd also try to place the tile next to the footing, OR run one on top if it was the only option. It really depends on the placement of the existing cross bleeders.


There's really nothing wrong with that much stone IMO or my experience. We typically take 2-3" stone to within 18" of grade, and then fill the balance with spoils & topsoil over filter fabric. It may seem like the stone would attract more water but it really serves to get any water near the foundation down the wall to the ext. draintile - bleeders - int. draintile - sump crock as fast as you possibly can. The longer water can lay against the wall, the more apt it is to find a weak point in the wall to leak through.
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Old 06-22-2011, 01:23 PM   #27
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


Been working on some maps/drawings/etc. Thought I would post a pic just to keep the thread alive and well...
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Old 06-22-2011, 01:30 PM   #28
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


Further questions I have....

I've been watching videos and reading. My foundation is cream city in the front and the extension (where the stairs our leaking) is block.

Can the black mastic I've seen applied to foundations be applied to a cream city brick foundation?

Considering the home was built in 1897, it is most likely not that the outside drain tile is clogged; but that there isn't any; correct?
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Old 06-26-2011, 02:32 PM   #29
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


Well, I got a full render of the backyard done; will now start rendering what we would like to do; and hopefully it works with fixing the problem...

The slope from the garage down seems to be just over 4 degrees.

here are some pics....




Questions still standing:
  1. Cany I apply the waterproofing mastic to cream city brick?
  2. How big of a trench will I need?
  3. I'm likely adding a perimeter drain instead of replacing one; due to age?
  4. Can I build a deck over the walk-out (have doors built into floor of deck)?
  5. Is it unhead of to pour a concrete patio/deck and have a drain in it?
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Old 06-28-2011, 09:24 PM   #30
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The huge water in basement epic picture thread. Money has run out, water hasn't.


Ok, so here is a rough render of a possible new backyard layout. All of our layout ideas are based on this retaining wall between the garage and the house..

So my previous questions + Can this work?
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