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-   -   How to repair main supporting beam. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/how-repair-main-supporting-beam-170280/)

hohadcr 01-27-2013 02:23 PM

How to repair main supporting beam.
 
2 Attachment(s)
It's a 2-storey 100 year old home with crawspace, attached on both sides to neighbour's buildings. Front yard is on the sidewalk, back yard can be accessed. The craw space is maybe 4 feet high with dirt floor. Foundation is cement, and all other supporting beams are big wood logs.

Over the years, in some area, especially the area below the doorway, moisture, coldness or whatever has gone into the crawspace, and weathered part of some wooden supporting beams. see pics.

I know the best way is to redo all. but.... I want to know how to reinforce the wooden structural beams w/o redoing all the foundation.

I have seen people putting another beam of the same size right next to the existing compromised beam and bolt them together. Is that the way to do it? How about the corners?

Thanks a lot in advance.

joecaption 01-27-2013 02:38 PM

If your talking about the board laying right on top of the block that all there other wood is sitting on, that the mud sill or foundation plate.
There is no way to just attach something to that one.
The floor joist would have to be lifted to get the weight off of it in order to replace it. Not a great DIY job at all.
Sure looks like #1 there's something wrong on the outside causing this.
#2 It looks like that was not a pressure treated bottom plate.
There was no such thing as pressure treated when that house was built.

hohadcr 01-27-2013 03:56 PM

I know it isn't a easy job, but the quote I get from local pros are at least 60-100k. They say they need to try to dig a tunnel from the back yard to reach the crawspace and start to work on the area....all the figuring out cost time, thus $$

So, gotta figure out a way to do it with some sort of DIY style.

I searched online and found people that did lift their homes themselves... hope to get some insights here.

Thanks thanks...

joecaption 01-27-2013 04:09 PM

Those prices sure seem high to me but I'm not there to see it.
Trouble is your trying to lift a muliti story house.
There not a whole lot of room to work.
The trick is to lift it and not do any damage to the home.


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