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-   -   How to Nail New Siding Under Existing Siding (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/how-nail-new-siding-under-existing-siding-144348/)

Shuriko 05-20-2012 03:39 PM

How to Nail New Siding Under Existing Siding
 
Hi Everyone:

I have been a viewer on this site and this is my first posting. Great site by the way.

I have an older home (60 years old) that has cedar siding. The siding is about 15-1/2" to 16" long and the widths vary (3" to 12"). Each siding is exposed about 7". The siding is also tapered on one side and it is about 3/8" to 1/2" thick at the butt. I uploaded 2 pictures so you have a much better idea of what the siding looks like. One picture is the back side (non-exposed side) and the other one is of the garage, but the house exterior is the same.

http://s475.photobucket.com/albums/r...leofSiding.jpg

The wall has no plywood or OSB sheathing. The framing is 2x4 with 1x4 continuous horizontal battens @ 6-3/4" O.C. The siding is nailed to the 1x battens.

I am need of replacing a few of the cedar sidings, but not the entire wall. My question is how do you nail the new sidings correctly under the existing siding above (covering) it? I want to be clear that I will be sliding the new piece under the existing piece that is in good condition, and will be nailing the new under the existing so that it must be secured to the 1x battens. By my estimate the nail will head will be about 1" (or so) above the overlap measured from butt end of the existing siding.

I refered to various websites, youtube videos, forums, Cedar Shake & Shingle Bureau, etc. and I cannot find a single source detailing how to nail replacing shingles so that the nail is below the existing siding sitting over the replacement siding. A few suggested nailing right through the existing and new, but that is not correct since it will not allow the exisiting to expand and contract.

Sorry for the long post but I prefer being clear to my situation then to take the reader off tangent.

Thank you

jaydevries 05-20-2012 03:47 PM

the way i do it on replacement is face nail with finish nails then if getting pianted fill in nail hole

Shuriko 05-20-2012 04:06 PM

Hi Jay:

Thanks for the suggestiong but I am not totally clear. Are you refering to nailing right through the existing siding lying over the new below it then using a nail punch to push the nail clear pass the existing? Or are you suggesting nailing both the existing and new together? If latter then that is not suggested since the existing is now secured at the middle and butt end. When the existing wants to expand it is locked in and the siding will crack.

joecaption 05-20-2012 04:44 PM

If you replacing boards in the middle of a wall there is no way to get around having to face nail it.
I would have used ring shank stainless steel siding nails instead of finish nails.

Shuriko 05-20-2012 05:22 PM

Thanks Joe....I was afraid of that response. Easy to do but my concern is to reduce the likelihood of splitting from expansion and contraction.

Shuriko 05-20-2012 05:28 PM

I came across this website for suggesting nailing under the existing course (see step 5). But it isn't totally clear to me what occurs to the new siding during step 6. Depending on the nail it will either bend upwards during step 6 or the nail will simply elongate the hole in the new siding when it is tap upwards by 1/2".

http://www.diyadvice.com/diy/siding/...ding-shingles/

kwikfishron 05-20-2012 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shuriko (Post 925267)
Thanks Joe....I was afraid of that response. Easy to do but my concern is to reduce the likelihood of splitting from expansion and contraction.

Nothing to worry about. :no:

How do you think the shingles under the windows, or the top coarse are nailed?

Tom Struble 05-20-2012 07:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shuriko (Post 925269)
I came across this website for suggesting nailing under the existing course (see step 5). But it isn't totally clear to me what occurs to the new siding during step 6. Depending on the nail it will either bend upwards during step 6 or the nail will simply elongate the hole in the new siding when it is tap upwards by 1/2".

http://www.diyadvice.com/diy/siding/...ding-shingles/


i use this technique alot,but i leave the shingle low by 1/4'' lift the over lapping shingle and get the nail started under the overlapping shingle,use a nail set to drive it flush then tap up your shingle to exposure

loneframer 05-20-2012 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Struble (Post 925343)
i use this technique alot,but i leave the shingle low by 1/4'' lift the over lapping shingle and get the nail started under the overlapping shingle,use a nail set to drive it flush then tap up your shingle to exposure

I agree with Tom,....again.:huh::eek::huh:

kwikfishron 05-20-2012 07:45 PM

The only problem with that method (which I’ve done many times) is when you knock that shingle up that “ is where it’s going to want to split. Looks great today but who knows later.

Op’s wall is painted, you’ll never notice a small face nail just below the coarse above.

Tom Struble 05-20-2012 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by loneframer (Post 925366)
I agree with Tom,....again.:huh::eek::huh:

you know you like me:wink:

Shuriko 05-20-2012 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 925272)
Nothing to worry about. :no:

How do you think the shingles under the windows, or the top coarse are nailed?

kwikfishron, off hand I do not know how they are nailed at the top because there is a trim piece (looks like a 1x4) that runs right over the seam where the siding abuts the soffit. But if the siding is the original to the home, which could be, then the nails (I assume) are nailed at the top of the last course and the 1x runs right over it or it is nailed through the 1x to hold the last course in place.

As for the course that runs below the window sill there is a narrow strip of siding (around 2") that runs over the seam where the last course abuts the bottom of the sill. Nails run right through the cedar strip and siding.

Shuriko 05-20-2012 08:13 PM

Loneframer and Tom thank you for your responses.

As kwikfishron indicated I too believe that the elongation produced by the 1/2" or 1/4" shift by pounding the siding level will promote future cracks.

I do have a question with this procedure however. If you are able to pound the nail in at an angle with the siding at 1/4" lower than the adjoining siding why couldn't you close the distance further thereby eliminating the necessity to level by pounding the siding? Or is it the goal to get the bottom as close to level as possible prior to inserting the nail and pounding the siding afterwards is to ensure the course is level since it maybe impossible to level it in the first place?

kwikfishron 05-20-2012 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shuriko (Post 925388)
kwikfishron, off hand I do not know how they are nailed at the top because there is a trim piece (looks like a 1x4) that runs right over the seam where the siding abuts the soffit. But if the siding is the original to the home, which could be, then the nails (I assume) are nailed at the top of the last course and the 1x runs right over it or it is nailed through the 1x to hold the last course in place.

As for the course that runs below the window sill there is a narrow strip of siding (around 2") that runs over the seam where the last course abuts the bottom of the sill. Nails run right through the cedar strip and siding.

I have a buddy that nails that strip under the windows like that because it’s faster to staple those shingles now and just cover with a piece of trim.

When you nail small courses (2-3” shingles) under windows and such you need to pre-drill them or they can or will split, this takes time. I take the time to make sure all exposed nails lines are straight and uniform for a nice finished look. That trim strip is simply faster and I can’t say I’ve never done it.

In your particular case though you’re over thinking this a bit. Remove the old shingle, install the new nailing (4-5D ring shank siding nail) just below the coarse above, paint it and be done with it.

Here’s a little tip if you’re worried about splitting…Hold the head of the nail on a hard surface, with your hammer tap on the point of the nail to dull or round off the point.

There’s your (almost) split proof nail.

Tom Struble 05-20-2012 08:46 PM

oh my..:huh: you are an old timer with a tip like that:wheelchair:


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