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Old 03-12-2013, 09:37 PM   #16
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How important is pressure treated wood?


And another thing, those walls in your basement are not load bearing so if the bottom plate was to turn to dust the structure of the wall would still stay in place just fine.

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Old 03-12-2013, 10:51 PM   #17
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How important is pressure treated wood?


I always suggest using rigid foamboard under a wall when there is doubt that a plastic vapor barrier was used under the slab pour at install, three reasons;

1. act as a capillary break to stop moisture from wicking up to the studs (plastic strips act as vapor barriers but do not address #2, or #30) due to temperature/pressure differences. Without a test of plastic sheeting (2'x2' in various spots on the slab, at various times of year) taped to the concrete to show true moisture availability in case of poor downspout drainage, deep-ground springs, different soil types that direct underground water to the slab-capillarity, etc. Moisture that may dissipate when exposed due to air currents in the basement will be blocked from surface drying after drywall. Once you insulate/drywall, it's another ball-game... especially if living near a lake, ravine or high water table. http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code As you live in a dryer climate, may not need it- after checking everything else.

2. act as a thermal break to stop your conditioned room air from heating the earth under the slab through conduction. A sill-sealer stops #1, and #3, but does next to practically nothing to insulate. With the wall/framing at 70*F and the slab at 50-60*F, (heat sink) why pay to warm it and the earth below. 7-8 sq.ft. of plate. With an inch of XPS (R-5) you decouple it from the slab thermally- reducing heat transfer by 84%, pp.2; http://www.enersavesystems.com/pdf/E...Insulation.pdf In fact, those members living in G.W. temps of 45*F and below (includes all of Canada) http://www.epa.gov/athens/learn2mode...enrys_map.html should also use it under a wood sub-floor or in place of DriCore as basements 6' below grade are about 10*F warmer than the surface yet may get condensation under the finish flooring or carpeting, pp.4; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...g-your-basment

3. acts as an air-barrier, the first line of defense to the continuous (R-10 in Zone 5, 6; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic..._11_sec002.htm) foamboard/concrete wall where moisture in the basement air can condense. 1/16" (or less) gap will compromise an air barrier. ADA the drywall: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...wall-approach/ IMO, add a bead of caulking on both sides of f.b. under plate. Be sure to f.b./canned foam the rims against air in/exfiltration;http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...l_seal_rev.pdf

Mark both sides of plate on concrete slab, tie the studs together with a 8-10' 2x4 to keep them in check (about a foot above plate- use screws), use a circular saw on its side with the 1-1/2" table on the existing plate, cut the studs(1-1/2" shorter), except the first/last, remove the plate, clean nails, add 1/2" plywood rips/foamboard, add the plate back, re-nail studs, fasten plate to concrete, move to next section.If saw binds with center ones, add a "springer" 2x4 (1/2" longer than total- slab/underside of bottom of top plates) to support the wall slightly.

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Old 03-13-2013, 08:04 AM   #18
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How important is pressure treated wood?


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Originally Posted by COLDIRON View Post
Come on hand drive don't be such a doomsdayer. If I were to build in the basement now I would use PT plates but if I already had a room there I'd be dammed if I would start ripping it down just because it didn't have PT plates. I would definitely check it though for moisture or rot.

I guess I'm like the cop that has been dealing with shady characters for to long but my shady characters is careless builders who build what needs to be fixed which I've been doing for a long time. I do not mean to be negative, it just happens. anyway, to the original poster- the moisture meter will tell the tale of whether or not to worry about the plates over the long haul...
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Old 03-13-2013, 08:25 AM   #19
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How important is pressure treated wood?


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I guess I'm like the cop that has been dealing with shady characters for to long but my shady characters is careless builders who build what needs to be fixed which I've been doing for a long time. I do not mean to be negative, it just happens. anyway, to the original poster- the moisture meter will tell the tale of whether or not to worry about the plates over the long haul...
I understand.
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Old 03-15-2013, 11:32 AM   #20
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How important is pressure treated wood?


Okay, another question then. Is PT wood ever required for permit reasons? Had the contractor back out, and a different one. Both said that they won't do unpermitted work in the basement, and that an inspector will require the walls torn down. Both cited the non PT wood as the sure sign that the framing wasn't done to code.

We are torn about the permit thing. On one hand, if there is ever a fire, we would hope that the value covered by the insurance would include any investment made in the basement. On the other hand, if we have to start completely over maybe the risk is worth it for the amount saved?

But if we were to just hire out parts separately in the finish- like hire an electrician to finish the last of the wiring/check what has been done, and then hang drywall ourselves, and hire out the mudding/taping- could we call the city and have an inspector come out on our own, and if we do, will the PT plate be a problem at that point? I imagine the answer will probably be regional, but maybe one answer is more common/likely.
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Old 03-15-2013, 05:29 PM   #21
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How important is pressure treated wood?


Time to post a photo or two. Removing just the bottom plate is not a big deal. Not sure the size of your basement but could be maybe a half day job at that. I would not try and fool an inspector. Hey Mr inspector everything is covered, you can come do the inspection now.
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:36 PM   #22
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How important is pressure treated wood?


The only real problem i can forsee is if you have it inspected. If you don't require a permit andyou likely don't. Don't worry. By the time that wood rots enough to cause a problem it will be time to redo the basement anyway. If your basement is wet you must deal with that problem first or it won't be usable as living space anyway.
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Old 03-16-2013, 12:25 AM   #23
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How important is pressure treated wood?


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Okay, another question then. Is PT wood ever required for permit reasons? Had the contractor back out, and a different one. Both said that they won't do unpermitted work in the basement, and that an inspector will require the walls torn down. Both cited the non PT wood as the sure sign that the framing wasn't done to code.

We are torn about the permit thing. On one hand, if there is ever a fire, we would hope that the value covered by the insurance would include any investment made in the basement. On the other hand, if we have to start completely over maybe the risk is worth it for the amount saved?

But if we were to just hire out parts separately in the finish- like hire an electrician to finish the last of the wiring/check what has been done, and then hang drywall ourselves, and hire out the mudding/taping- could we call the city and have an inspector come out on our own, and if we do, will the PT plate be a problem at that point? I imagine the answer will probably be regional, but maybe one answer is more common/likely.
sounds like it is time to get friends over and finish the work your self save some green backs and have a BBQ. for get the contractors they just want the extra money from the extra work. and the county or city will only know if you tell them.

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