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Old 07-02-2010, 05:51 PM   #1
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


I'm installing a back door going from my house to a deck I just built. See attached photo that shows where I opened the interior side of the wall. Right where I want to install the door there is a 1-by diagonal brace between the studs and the sheathing. The studs are actually notched on their exterior side to allow for the brace and to provide a solid, flat nailing surface for the sheathing. I know how to double the trimmer/king studs and build a header for the R.O., but I didn't expect this 1-by brace to be in my way. I'm afraid to completely ignore it (although that would be nice), in case it's serving some important load-bearing function, but I have to remove it in order to install the door. The proposed door location is a just a couple feet away from the corner of the house, if that matters. Anyone have any advice on how I should accommodate this pesky brace?
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Old 07-02-2010, 05:53 PM   #2
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


by the way, don't be confused by the "giant" stud in the forefront of the pic. That's part of my temporary brace wall.

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Old 07-02-2010, 06:13 PM   #3
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


That’s a “let in brace” and is “not needed” if the wall is sheeted.
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Old 07-02-2010, 07:01 PM   #4
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


pretty sure that was just put in to make building easier. can be cut.
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Old 07-02-2010, 07:27 PM   #5
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


ah that may be celotex sheathing,i would replace that with ply at the corners before i would cut it
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Old 07-02-2010, 08:15 PM   #6
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


Got me on that one.

I could have swore I seen T1-11 lines bleeding through the felt.
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Old 07-02-2010, 10:29 PM   #7
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


The let-in diagonal brace is there to transmit seismic and high wind forces to the ground. It is required when the sheathing/siding is not structural. To install a door at the corner you would need to add a header from the corner (and strapping) over the door and across or at least into the second stud bay from the door to create a shear panel next to the door. This would require exposing the area over the door header and areas abutting that on both sides. Then a new steel let-in or wood diagonal brace in that new shear panel to keep the shear flow from the corner to the foundation. OR a panel of plywood or acceptable similar sheathing acceptable by your LOCAL Building Department. Carpenters do not install diagonals unless required by Code, which is usually stated on the Approved plans. (No money in that!) So never remove wood from the house frame unless you know what you are doing.....

http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...c-twb-rcwb.asp

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Old 07-03-2010, 10:12 AM   #8
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


Thanks for all the help. It does seem to be non-structural siding (Celotex) behind the studs, so I guess I'll have to build a monster header and brace it up good to make it work. It would be nice to replace the panels with structural sheathing, but that would require removing more siding than is required for the door installation, and since this siding was put on in 1978, I doubt I'll ever find and exact match, and I haven't got the cash to re-side the entire house.
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Old 07-03-2010, 10:22 AM   #9
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


if there is enough open inside wall move it to the interior
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Old 07-03-2010, 12:50 PM   #10
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


I would cut out the opening, including the brace and then brace the wall as Gary suggested.
Rather than one angle brace, I would put in two, in a cross configuration.
Home Depot stocks these braces.
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Old 07-03-2010, 02:00 PM   #11
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


A monster header won't help. The header supports the load from above but does nothing to prevent what I call racking which is what the let in brace is for. How much of the let in brace will be gone? You may be able to sheath the inside wall with plywood nailed at 3" oc around the perimeter of each sheet and 6" oc in the field. Then put your drywall over that. I'm pretty sure you should have at least 32" of wall between the corner of the house and the doorway to get adequate racking resistance.

Are you in an eathuake or high wind area?
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Old 07-03-2010, 06:31 PM   #12
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


The header is required to transmit the lateral forces from high winds and seismic to the shear panel- usually within 5' of the corner, as per S.E's instructions I've built on a dozen houses here. With windows on each side of the corner, or a door within 32", it can be a local thing.

Tom M, contact your B.D. for the correct and acceptable method to be safe: http://bct.nrc.umass.edu/index.php/p...n-the-outside/

Be safe, Gary
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Old 07-06-2010, 07:34 PM   #13
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


Here's my solution in the attached photo (so far, anyway). Although I still haven't closed up the wall in case anyone has any last minute suggestions or advice if I did something unwise.

Basically I've got a 4x12 header (with foam board sandwiched inside) running from the corner of the house across the door frame and terminating at the following stud bay. The header is flush with the top plate throughout, and I've nailed on metal strapping over each stud running from the top plate, over the header and onto the face of the studs.

Is this enough to keep the structural integrity intact? I don't want any "racking" in the wall, but this seems pretty stout.
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Old 07-06-2010, 10:39 PM   #14
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


About all you can do now is to install steel gussets in the stud bays.
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Old 07-06-2010, 11:39 PM   #15
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How to handle a cross-brace that is in the way of a new door


You don't need any of the plates except to tie the header to the top plate at each end. The shear ply should run from the door jack stud 32" away from the door. I see you have a partition wall in the way. If you don't want to expose the sheathing to replace the cello with ply---- what you have is what you have.

Be safe, Gary

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