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-   -   How to determine if it's a load bearing wall? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/how-determine-if-its-load-bearing-wall-34540/)

tripower 12-28-2008 10:12 AM

How to determine if it's a load bearing wall?
 
I have an strange (upside down) "L" shaped wall right in the middle of my bathroom. I have been wondering why it was there other than possible it was a load bearing wall of some sort. I know the basics. Besides the exterior walls, the primary load bearing walls are usually in the middle of the house holding up the joists and usually run perpendicular to the joists. If I have the drywall removed and access to the joists how do I determine if the wall is load bearing?

iMisspell 12-28-2008 10:36 AM

It seams like you have the common knowledge, maybe posting a picture would be better.

steel baron usa 12-28-2008 10:17 PM

wall
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tripower (Post 203406)
I have an strange (upside down) "L" shaped wall right in the middle of my bathroom. I have been wondering why it was there other than possible it was a load bearing wall of some sort. I know the basics. Besides the exterior walls, the primary load bearing walls are usually in the middle of the house holding up the joists and usually run perpendicular to the joists. If I have the drywall removed and access to the joists how do I determine if the wall is load bearing?

Do the joists run with the wall or across it?
also what is width of your bath?

Just Bill 12-29-2008 06:28 AM

Depends on what is above and below that wall, but it sounds like you are describing a shower alcove to me. If the is major support under the wall or as steelbaron suggests, perpendicular joists above, it might be load load bearing.

tripower 12-29-2008 06:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Bill (Post 203719)
Depends on what is above and below that wall, but it sounds like you are describing a shower alcove to me. If the is major support under the wall or as steelbaron suggests, perpendicular joists above, it might be load load bearing.

There is not another wall on the floor beneath this wall, there are perpendicular joists above. Is there any way to confirm/test?

Termite 12-29-2008 08:54 AM

Numerous things have to be taken into consideration to determine if the wall is load bearing. The number one indicator would be that the ends of the joists are located over the wall. If the wall supports a splice, then it is a bearing wall for sure. That being said, even if the joists above aren't spliced then the wall can still be a bearing wall.

To know for sure if the wall is bearing, you need a professional to look at the framing/wall orientation of the home from the attic down.

tripower 12-29-2008 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 203764)
Numerous things have to be taken into consideration to determine if the wall is load bearing. The number one indicator would be that the ends of the joists are located over the wall. If the wall supports a splice, then it is a bearing wall for sure. That being said, even if the joists above aren't spliced then the wall can still be a bearing wall.

To know for sure if the wall is bearing, you need a professional to look at the framing/wall orientation of the home from the attic down.

Should this be a contractor or a structural engineer? No joist splice on the wall in fact this small wall is only about 2 feet away from the end of the joists that rest on what I believe to be the primary load bearing wall.

steel baron usa 12-30-2008 07:58 PM

bath wall
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tripower (Post 203721)
There is not another wall on the floor beneath this wall, there are perpendicular joists above. Is there any way to confirm/test?

sounds to me like it is not a bearing wall as you would have to have a wall on the floor directly underneath, this is the point to carry the weight through all floors to a footing underneath.
I would not be scared to tear it out if in fact there is not a header directly under it, that would also be another way of distributing the weight.

Hope it goes well

tripower 12-30-2008 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steel baron usa (Post 204564)
sounds to me like it is not a bearing wall as you would have to have a wall on the floor directly underneath, this is the point to carry the weight through all floors to a footing underneath.
I would not be scared to tear it out if in fact there is not a header directly under it, that would also be another way of distributing the weight.

Hope it goes well


That's what I would assume as well. The wall is only 3 1/2 feet long. It is just so strange to have it stop in the middle of the bathroom like that I could think of no other reason for it to be there.


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