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Old 05-23-2014, 06:03 PM   #46
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


Well, I just don't know what to do about it besides using Vulkem on all the cracks and seams where brick meets concrete.

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Old 05-23-2014, 09:27 PM   #47
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


Yeah, there isn't much to do at this stage.

The area under the concrete and brick should be sloped towards the outside and have a waterproof membrane on it.

It should also be self-supporting after the concrete has cured.

You should also be able to insulate it.

At this point, you can try some surface waterproofing. It seems they used to advertise some Thompson product for waterproofing such surfaces. And of course you have to seal up the big holes first.

You may still have some recourse with the builder. I'm not sure how important it is if the house is 3 months old or five years. This installation is either done right or not. It also doesn't matter if you are the first owner or the fifth. The job isn't up to industry standards. It was designed improperly and obviously it leaks. It is like a faulty ignition switch on a car.

One option is to remove the stoop from the house. Then you will be left with some brick coming up from the footings. Theoretically, there should be some flashing behind the siding (brick veneer) to keep the water from running down the wall and into your basement. However, given that this whole entry is covered by a roof, I think you can skip the flashing.

So you need to form up a floor below the stoop which will support a concrete pour. Slope the concrete out and pour the pre-slope. Make it 4" thick if you need to to support the span. You'll need re-bar in it, etc. You will need to have it so that some brick on the house side and sides will support the concrete after it cures. It will be held up on the outside by the foundation.

Now you have a pre-slope which will support itself after you strip the forms. Now you can pour another slab/brick rowlock on top of this or whatever. It will have the same slope towards the exterior. Any water which passes through this concrete and brickwork will hit the membrane and slab below and flow towards the outside.

Option 2 would be to just go over the top of what you have. Treat what you have as the pre-slope and go over it with a membrane and a new layer. I doubt you have the height for this option.

Think this over. Maybe some other guys will respond and have better ideas than I have. There are some experienced guys out there. I think Jomama has a good idea of what you are dealing with.

It shouldn't be too big of a deal to remove the stoop and re-do it. You may be able to market this to the builder as a way for him to understand what is wrong with his system and come up with a mitigation system.

Good luck.
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Old 05-24-2014, 09:03 AM   #48
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


I know that's probably the right way to do it, but that would be extraordinarily expensive. I know we'd probably run into some unforeseen issues that would no doubt add to the cost. Just had someone (my mower/landscaper), who poured residential concrete for 14 years and is familiar with the construction of the homes on my block, over to assess the situation. He agrees the water is coming in at the seams on the stoop/porch, and recommended using concrete patch or the Vulkem I already have to seal the seams, then buy a bucket of concrete sealant and roll on two or three coats over the entire porch. He will also run the downspout under ground and daylight it just outside of the retaining wall.

Last edited by Patrick G.; 05-24-2014 at 09:09 AM.
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Old 05-24-2014, 05:16 PM   #49
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


This "top waterproofing" will hopefully stop the leak, just remember to repeat every few years.
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Old 07-31-2014, 09:23 PM   #50
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


You can get help from this article by a waterproofing company on how to fix a basement leak ............. Hope that helps!


Last edited by BigJim; 08-01-2014 at 08:20 PM. Reason: Link removed
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