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Old 05-13-2014, 05:44 AM   #16
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


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So, for someone who isn't rich, what is the sensible thing to do about this problem?
Ayuh,.... Get rid of the garden,...

The garden is holdin' water against yer foundation,....

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Old 05-13-2014, 11:46 AM   #17
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


And when you have dug it down, look at the base of the brick. Likely there are weeps to allow condensation to drain away. If your landscaping is higher than the weeps, then you've got an excellent path for water to enter instead of exit.......... and yes that black stuff is probably mold, and should probably be addressed as soon as the water issue is solved.
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Old 05-13-2014, 05:06 PM   #18
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Yes, I do have a bit of a roof over my entry:





And the window sill looks dry:






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Old 05-13-2014, 05:57 PM   #19
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


I can't tell whether there is any slope to your window sill.

It also appears that your window sills don't extend out beyond the veneer.

From your original photo, am I correct when I say that the floor joists are resting on the concrete wall?

I can't see how much roof is draining into that downspout, but it looks like a very small amount.

How is the concrete floor of your recessed entry detailed? It looks like you have some floor joists under the concrete, then some osb. Is there some tar paper or plastic or something above the osb?


What is the width of those floor joists under the concrete?
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Old 05-13-2014, 06:30 PM   #20
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I can't tell whether there is any slope to your window sill.

It also appears that your window sills don't extend out beyond the veneer.

From your original photo, am I correct when I say that the floor joists are resting on the concrete wall?

I can't see how much roof is draining into that downspout, but it looks like a very small amount.

How is the concrete floor of your recessed entry detailed? It looks like you have some floor joists under the concrete, then some osb. Is there some tar paper or plastic or something above the osb?


What is the width of those floor joists under the concrete?
The sills do extend a bit beyond the veneer (how do we know this is veneer vs. real brick?), and slope slightly downward away from the house:



The floor joists are resting on concrete, yes. They measure 1.5" x 5.5". They are treated floor joists, under treated plywood, topped off with ice-and-water shield.
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Old 05-13-2014, 06:44 PM   #21
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


I'm not sure why someone would frame up a recessed entry like that, but there must have been a reason.

I wonder if the concrete is sloped, and the osb floor underneath?

Even if the waterproofing is good and holding up well and the osb is pre-sloped, you have a potential for a lot of condensation against that osb in the cool basement in the summer.

And of course you have a very cold spot there in the winter.

It is more common here to have the recessed entry or stoop or porch supported temporarily for the concrete placement, then the framing/floor sheathing can be removed.

I just insulated one about 4' deep and 6' long which was bare concrete. There was no waterproofing underneath and I put 2" of xps against it. It is covered by a 40" soffit and sloped well on the top. There is no sign of water coming in.

Anyway, I'm just trying to figure out how your house was built.

I wouldn't rule out that mold coming from condensation water.

I would also insulate your rim joist all the way around before it turns black as well.
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Old 05-13-2014, 07:24 PM   #22
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


Veneer is real brick, It just means there is a wall behind it. Doesn't look like water is coming from garden unless there is a step down into that room. I wouldn't rule out the window. I would open the window and pour a glass of water on the inside from the screen to simulate water hitting the window. See if it runs out the weep holes under screen.
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Old 05-13-2014, 07:24 PM   #23
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I just forwarded this thread to my builder. His response:

"It's not the grade. I guarantee the water is coming in between the brick and concrete on the front porch. I will run by and caulk the space to see if that takes care of it. Also, the wood is turning black because it is wet - it's not mold. The way that porch is poured, all the wood could come out and the porch would stay. So, structure wise it will not go anywhere."

He's under no obligation to take a look at this, so I sincerely appreciate his willingness to help. I told him this makes sense because the black areas on the wood are a bit farther north than the downspout, pretty much right in line with the front step.

Front Porch Step:



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Old 05-13-2014, 07:47 PM   #24
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Do not let your builder "Caulk" their problem. Get an inspector in and have them do a full write up. Your builder is just trying to keep you and them out of court. Because they failed to do the job properly.

It is 100% Landscaping that is causing water to get down there. The pictures do not lie.
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Old 05-13-2014, 07:52 PM   #25
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I would have no grounds to take him to court if I wanted to. Why are you so convinced it's landscaping when the affected area of the wood is directly behind/under the porch step?
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Old 05-13-2014, 08:12 PM   #26
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Note that I didn't hire him to build the house, I just purchased the house from him when it was 90% completed.
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Old 05-13-2014, 08:21 PM   #27
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Now that I see the surface of the floor, I would think that the water is draining off the concrete floor and towards the nice brick on the edge. It is draining down when it hits that joint.

You can certainly caulk that with some Vulkem, but I would think with a deck detailed like that, one would want a secondary drainage plane below.

I like the concrete with brick edging, but this will always be a maintenance problem.
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Old 05-13-2014, 09:50 PM   #28
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So the builder is saying he suspects the problem here? Typical builder solution to a water problem is to caulk it without verifying that is the issue.
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Old 05-13-2014, 09:53 PM   #29
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


I'd also wonder at the design that would have what appears to be two moderate sized roof planes that drain into a single downspout which is not connected to the storm system but is left to drain into a landscaping bed as pictured.
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Old 05-13-2014, 10:06 PM   #30
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How to deal with this water problem (pics inside)?


It would not be that hard Hammerlane for the OP to run black flex pipe into the ground and out the side below the slope. To help funnel that water out of there.

To me. It is sounding like the OP does not want upset the landscaping, which is not that hard to do. Any local mom & pop Garden Center would have the containers to place the plants into. The other materials would go onto a tarp as is done in these kind of cases.

Simple fix that can be done in a weekend. But too many excuses are coming from the OP, that they do not want to attempt to correct.

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