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Old 04-09-2013, 09:59 AM   #1
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HomeDepot Garage Kits w. "Sturdy" Wood Floors


Hey All,I had recently totaled my motorcycle and to keep the (soon to be) wife happy, I'm looking at replacing it with an older muscle car. The only issue is that my property doesn't have a garage on it and I don't really want to leave something under a tarp or a portable garage because I feel as they are eye sores.My question is, I see the Lowes and Home Depot have plenty of garage options with sturdy wood floor options. Such as the following... (I hope this doesn't break any rules sharing these links)http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/2026893...&R=202689301My concern is will these floors last with an automobile sitting on them for long periods of time?Also, as for preping the group for something like this, can I throw down some stone pavers on level ground to minimize the rotting from the moist ground in New England.If you also think it would be beneficial, I could setup some underground PVC gutters with some crushed stone on it to try and mitigate any water. (Not sure if that would be necessary - just an idea)As I'm sure you may have figured it out, but I'm certainly not a seasoned vet in contruction, so for those that are - I look forward to hearing back from you all.Thanks in advance.

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Old 04-09-2013, 11:33 AM   #2
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HomeDepot Garage Kits w. "Sturdy" Wood Floors


My personal thought is that a wood floor is a poor choice for an automotive garage where you will be working on the car. Maybe save up a little longer before buying the project car so you can have a concrete pad/floor poured. Wood, even if treated properly, is still not going to be the best choice to avoid sucking up not only ground-moisture, but oil, gasoline, paint, etc. that will come with working on an older car. You also don't want to have to second-guess floor strength when you are putting the weight of the car in a small area, like on a jack or jack-stands.

If the only thing you are going to be doing is parking the car in there, maybe you can get-by with the wood floor, but looking at the price of the wood-floored kits and the kits without floors, you might not be too far behind to have the floor poured. At least get some estimates from contractors before you decide one way or the other.

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Old 04-09-2013, 11:46 AM   #3
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HomeDepot Garage Kits w. "Sturdy" Wood Floors


I think you will find (check with your building department) that a wooden floor does not meet the Massachusetts Building Code.

R309.1 Floor surface. Garage floor surfaces shall be of approved noncombustible material.

The area of floor used for parking of automobiles or other vehicles shall be sloped to facilitate the movement of liquids to a drain or toward the main vehicle entry doorway.



Check the length of muscle cars. 16' is kind of short, unless your muscle car is a Mini Cooper. Remember at best that is outside-to-outside measurements and not interior.

You may be required to obtain a building permit (again check with your building department).

I would go into the building department at town hall and have a sit down with your building official before deciding on anything.

Good luck!
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:22 PM   #4
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HomeDepot Garage Kits w. "Sturdy" Wood Floors


hyunelan2 and GBrackins,Thank you for your responses. You've both pretty much confirmed my concerns and also gave me a few areas that I didn't even think about.I appreciate your comments as they've made me reconsider my options.I guess it's time to go price out concrete pads. Any idea how thick of a concrete foundation I should be looking at for a 1 car garage? 6 inches on a crushed stone foundation sound about right? Would I need rebar?Thanks again,Bryan
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Old 04-09-2013, 02:07 PM   #5
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typically a 4-inch thick 3,000 psi concrete slab will be compliant with the building code. With that said I normally spec out 4,000 psi because I have yet to find anyone in my area that slow cures concrete so this way I'm fairly certain of ending up with 3,000 psi. of course you'll have to remove the top and sub soil.

Depending on the square footage you may or may not be required to have a frost wall. this is where footing extend down 48" from the adjacent grade. this is a Massachusetts requirement for frost depth. If you are required to have a frost wall foundation I would certainly extend the top of the wall at least 12" above the top of slab. This would help to prevent rot in the lower portion of your wood framed walls.

Go into to you see your building official and find out what the requirements are. We do have a uniform state-wide building code, however you sometimes have officials that have their own interpretations on the rules.

here are links for code references 2009 International Residential Code, the basis for the residential code in Mass. Here are the revisions the commonwealth made from the IRC code (changes) http://www.mass.gov/eopss/consumer-p...tial-code.html

post back with any questions.
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Old 04-09-2013, 02:23 PM   #6
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Our rule of thumb was that garage floors need to min 5.5 inch thick (2x6 forms) 3400psi concrete with 6 inches of well compacted quarry process below. I would not even think about parking a car on a HD plywood floor. You are dreaming.
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Old 04-09-2013, 04:52 PM   #7
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"typically a 4-inch thick 3,000 psi concrete slab will be compliant with the building code. With that said I normally spec out 4,000 psi because I have yet to find anyone in my area that slow cures concrete so this way I'm fairly certain of ending up with 3,000 psi. of course you'll have to remove the top and sub soil."


Hey Gary,can you define the slow cure your talking about here??
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Old 04-09-2013, 04:54 PM   #8
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using a curing compound, or keeping the concrete moist & covered to prevent rapid evaporation of the moisture. allows the concrete to develop its proper compressive strength

http://www.cadman.com/section.asp?pageid=3133
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Old 04-09-2013, 05:02 PM   #9
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for those than enjoy a boring read I recommend ACI 308 ..... http://web.njit.edu/~washd/cim305/do...re/308R_01.pdf
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:02 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GBrackins View Post
using a curing compound, or keeping the concrete moist & covered to prevent rapid evaporation of the moisture. allows the concrete to develop its proper compressive strength

http://www.cadman.com/section.asp?pageid=3133

That's odd,all they do here is add it in the specs and it's done.
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:34 PM   #11
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I know, I'm from FLA originally .... LOL

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