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Old 10-01-2012, 09:41 AM   #1
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High Spot in Upstairs Bedroom Floor - Foundation Experts Help!


Hi!
First I want to introduce myself. I just registered on this forum and think it is great! I consider myself an "advanced" DIY'er as I've tackled full room reno including electric, plumbing, I've also did my share of roofing, tile.. etc.. No "pro" here, but I think I do ok. The honey-do list keeps growing as my knowledge does!

Anyway, here's my long winded question for the foundation experts. I own an English Tudor built in 1936 on Long Island, NY. It is made of brick, stone, and the second floor exterior is wood clap board siding. The inside is plaster/lathe construction.
My question pertains to an upstairs bedroom that has a high spot in a good portion of the floor.
Layout: Three of the BR walls are exterior. The rise in the floor gradually starts from just below a window directly in front when you walk in, then increases towards to the left and is at its highest point at the left corner of the room while standing in the bedroom doorway. There is an exterior door leading to a small deck and it is located in the left wall which is perpendicular to the highest point of the hump.

Going outside, looking at the exterior brick wall directly below the window as noted above, you will see a good 1/2" separation or crack in the brick mortar where the first course of brick sits on the rim of the top of the foundation wall. The door to the deck upstairs as mentioned is severely out of plumb and is cocked up on its right corner about 3/4". This corner is closest to the high point of the floor. Going in the basement you will see the main steel beam has been pushed up and is off the original foundation wall about 3/4" directly below the area where the brick is cracked outside. The original owner looks like they had someone fill this with some cement as it looks after the fact.

My question is, is this issue known as heaving? I believe so because the rest of the floors upstairs are flat. If so, can this be fixed relatively easily? Not saying I would do it myself, but does this require excavation? Lastly, the golden question, how much does something like this typcally cost?? We've been in the house 5 years and knowing about this issue when we bought it we always planned to fix it. Lastly, I don't believe it is moving any longer.

Thanks!!!
John C


Last edited by JohnC20; 10-01-2012 at 09:44 AM.
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:38 AM   #2
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High Spot in Upstairs Bedroom Floor - Foundation Experts Help!


John,

Welcome to the forum!

If I were in your place I would not turn to an internet forum that can neither see your issues, or visit your site for evaluation. While there are numerous extremely talented and knowledgeable members on here we cannot see what you can.

I would recommend investing in the services of a local professional engineer for a proper evaluation. They will come to your home, look at your issues, determine a cause and propose a corrective course of action. Based upon their determination of the cause and their course of action it may be simple to correct, or it could be extensive, but at least you would know and could correct the issues the first time, not merely try various suggestions without positive results.

Just my humble opinion .....

Good luck!

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Old 10-01-2012, 11:13 AM   #3
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High Spot in Upstairs Bedroom Floor - Foundation Experts Help!


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Originally Posted by GBrackins View Post
John,

Welcome to the forum!

If I were in your place I would not turn to an internet forum that can neither see your issues, or visit your site for evaluation. While there are numerous extremely talented and knowledgeable members on here we cannot see what you can.

I would recommend investing in the services of a local professional engineer for a proper evaluation. They will come to your home, look at your issues, determine a cause and propose a corrective course of action. Based upon their determination of the cause and their course of action it may be simple to correct, or it could be extensive, but at least you would know and could correct the issues the first time, not merely try various suggestions without positive results.

Just my humble opinion .....

Good luck!
Thanks! I do appreciate your opinion. I was hoping to see if someone else experienced what I am describing. I know what you mean, it's like trying to get medical advice over the phone. I plan to have a pro take a look as well.

Thanks again!!
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