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Old 07-30-2005, 01:41 PM   #1
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Help Needed: Hurricane-proofing a Shed (Mr. Teetorbilt?)


Teetorbilt-

I read in another thread you posted in at the pro contractor's site that you have built sheds which survived a couple of hurricanes, so I thought that you would be the ideal person to help me with this issue.

I am about to build a 16x16 shed on a pre-existing concrete slab, but I have to put it up on cinder block piers due to irrigation/flood plain issues. I am in New Orleans, so I have a degree of hurricane vulnerability, and I am trying to figure out the best way to give the shed maximum lateral and vertical stability.

For lateral stability, I've been told to drill into the slab beneath each pier/cinder block location, insert a bolt into the hole, and cement the bolt into the gap in the cinder block. However, noone gives a consistent answer to these questions:

1. how deep, and at what diameter, should I drill into the foundation?

2. what diameter, length, and type of bolt should I use?

3. how do I secure the bolt into the slab?

4. should the bolt go through the floor sill?

As for vertical stability, I've been told that the weight of the structure "should be" adequate.

Again, due to the hurricane vulnerability, I am wondering if some kind of anchor system would be a good idea?

Is there any other advice you could give me about how to "hurricane-proof" my shed?

Thanks in advance for your time and expertise!


Last edited by Badseed; 07-30-2005 at 03:26 PM.
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Old 07-30-2005, 09:40 PM   #2
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Help Needed: Hurricane-proofing a Shed (Mr. Teetorbilt?)


I need to know how thick the slab is, how many courses of block that you need to go up, will salt be a problem at any time? The weight of the shed will not be enough which is why you are tying it down. Even on a single course of block, you will have to skirt the space to prevent uplift. We can work on this, bear in mind that it will be more expensive than conventional construction but will fair better than your house. My next one, slated for next year, will be rated for 250 MPH and will become our 'safe house'. I'm not fooling around this time.

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Old 08-01-2005, 07:47 PM   #3
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Help Needed: Hurricane-proofing a Shed (Mr. Teetorbilt?)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Teetorbilt
I need to know how thick the slab is, how many courses of block that you need to go up, will salt be a problem at any time? The weight of the shed will not be enough which is why you are tying it down. Even on a single course of block, you will have to skirt the space to prevent uplift. We can work on this, bear in mind that it will be more expensive than conventional construction but will fair better than your house. My next one, slated for next year, will be rated for 250 MPH and will become our 'safe house'. I'm not fooling around this time.
That's funny. "Local man continues working on his handmade armoir in his tool shed while the rest of South Florida evacuates."

The slab is 6 inches. It's at the head of a driveway, and a garage rested on it for about 40 years, followed by 40 years of a tin shack. It is in good condition and doesnt seem to be sinking anywhere.

I may only need on course of block, but 2 courses would probably be the most sensible. I don't think I need a 250 mph rating, but it would definitely be a good thing to survive a Cat 3. Anything larger than that, and the 12 feet of flood water and sewage in the city will pretty much make my little shed a moot point.

I'd be interested to learn how to skirt the structure.

Thanks for your response!

almost forgot: salt is not an issue here.

Last edited by Badseed; 08-01-2005 at 07:55 PM.
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Old 08-01-2005, 11:09 PM   #4
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Help Needed: Hurricane-proofing a Shed (Mr. Teetorbilt?)


You are going to need your local code requirement here.
My thought would be; Lay out your block placement, 2 course high, on 4 ft. centers on perimeter. Go 2X2 on all pylons and add one in the center. You may want to block in the rest of the 'skirt', allow for acess somewhere. The northside is the best. When laid out, drill for 5/8" lag shields to go up the center of the blocks. Buy some 5/8' lag bolts and 5/8 allthread rod, have the allthread welded to the top of the lagbolts. Tell the welder to 'burn it', you want maximum penetration.
Install your new tiedowns and slide the blocks over the top. You will need to 'convince' (bend) them them a bit to get them close to the wall of the block, and pour the voids. We are going 2X6 construction as opposed to 2X4.
At this stage, you should have 14 pylons with 5/8" allthread standing proud, all level and ready to begin construction. You should also have an inspection here. If you opted to block everything in. skirting will not be an issue.
Make a diagram of this and take it to the bldg. dept, if it is not approved, come back and tell me why.
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